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Machinery's Handbook 25

Machinery's Handbook 25

Machinery's Handbook 25

(OP)
I just bought Machinery's handbook 25 since it was decently priced, but in searching through it, I'm not seeing simple stuff like clearances holes for inch fasteners. Everything seems metric. I have a copy of 28 available at work and it does have all this. Does anyone else know if this just wasn't printed in this version? Am I missing it?

Thanks for the help!

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

Try looking on page 1823.

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

(OP)
Thank you. That looks like it's the right table. Interesting that in edition 25 a free fit is .2660 for a 1/4 fastener, where in edition 28, that's considered a close fit. Here the close fit is .2570

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

Did they ever fix the "too thin pages" issue, where you could practically read the next page's text through the current one?

Dan - Owner
http://www.Hi-TecDesigns.com

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

Quote (MacGyverS2000)

Did they ever fix the "too thin pages" issue, where you could practically read the next page's text through the current one?

My 30th eon is that way, so I am going to say no, they did not fix it.

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

"Interesting that in edition 25 a free fit is .2660 for a 1/4 fastener, where in edition 28, that's considered a close fit. Here the close fit is .2570."

I don't have either edition to compare, but some tables are for Socket Head Cap Screws, some for Cap Screws.
There is the possibility some are based on different standards, like ASME B18.2.8, NAS618, but the STD should be identified. https://forum.solidworks.com/servlet/JiveServlet/s...

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

Keep in mind that a fastener is not a fastener, a set screw for example is a class three thread vs a class two for common cap screws, hence different standards and different charts within a given edition of MH.

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

The table I referenced out of the 'Machinery's Handbook 25' on page 1823 is titled:

"Tap Drills and Clearance Drills for Machine Screws with American National Thread Form" and covers screw sizes from #0 to 1/2 inch. It's marked table #4 and is found in the chapter titled "Threads and Threading", sub-section "Tapping and Thread Cutting" (which admittedly appears to be an odd place to include 'clearance hole' specs).

And before anyone asks, there was NO specific standard referenced by this table.

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

JohnRBaker,

"American National Thread Form"???

Not UNC?

--
JHG

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

Like I said, there was NO mention of any standard. What you see is what you get winky smile

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

JohnRBaker,

I don't have my 1941 copy of French's with me. I believe that was the screw standard in the USA prior to WWII.

--
JHG

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

Just as a sanity check, I dug out my father's old 'Machinery's Handbook, 14th Edition' (© 1953) and I found the exact same table, the only difference being that there was no mention of the 'American National Thread Form'. In fact, it looks like they used the same page layout master 43 years later, as seen in the image below (you can even see a bit of that aforementioned bleed-through in the upper handbook}:

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

JohnRBaker,

Found it! Page 1900 in the 26th edition, Table 4.

Still, they are quoting American National Standard thread form. Table 2 on page 1891 is Recommended Hole Size Limits Before Tapping Unified Threads. Strictly speaking, the major diameters are the same. The thread form should not affect the clearance hole.

--
JHG

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

Page 2089 of the 30th edition, same format as the table in editions pictured.

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

I printed mine on heavy card stock, so the bock is about 80 feet thick, but no bleed through. Also, to make it easier to read, the pages are D-Size. It's a bit cumbersome, but no one has tried to borrow it yet.

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

Page 1443 of the 20th edition.
No change to John Baker's 15th and 25th edition lol

RE: Machinery's Handbook 25

monkeydog,

I am not surprised it has not changed. The standard is obsolete.

--
JHG

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