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AS3600 CL 8.2.7.4

AS3600 CL 8.2.7.4

(OP)
This clause restricts designers to essentially disregard the contribution of Vuc to the shear strength when you may have 'cracking' in a zone usually in compression due to moment reversal.

What are everyone's thoughts on assessing this, by checking whether the tension stress on the face in question exceeds f'ct.f ( ie 0.6 sqrt f'c)? If the tension stress is less, then the section remains uncracked at ULS and therefore full Vuc can be used.



RE: AS3600 CL 8.2.7.4

Can you post a screenshot of the clause, it might be related to earthquakes (moment reversal) and degradation of the shear capacity within potential plastic hinge regions. NZ codes (and other seismic provisions in other codes) have similar reductions based on the total level of curvature sustained, usually some percentage of the normal shear provisions to zero contribution based on degree of ductility and plastic curvature.

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