×
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!
  • Students Click Here

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Students Click Here

Jobs

floor loads

floor loads

floor loads

(OP)
We have a back porch that's been enclosed and converted into a mud room. One of the piers is cracked, and another has settled. I'm calculating footing sizes for the replacements.

My wife wants to eventually move the laundry from the basement to the mud room. What would be a suitable live load value for a full washing machine? I've seen a range 155-230 lbs online, but it's not clear if that's empty or full. Also, I should probably consider live load from a front loading washer on the spin cycle. We don't have one now, but we might someday.

Any suggestions?

Thanks!

RE: floor loads

You might want to talk about this on the structural engineering forum.
New footings and piers is just the start of your issues.
My hunch is that you will need to sister all of the joists, maybe going to deeper timbers also.
And then the perimeter will need to be beefed up, and so on.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
P.E. Metallurgy, Plymouth Tube

RE: floor loads

Quote (ACtrafficengr)

I've seen a range 155-230 lbs online, but it's not clear if that's empty or full

Why in the heck would anyone publish load rating values for an empty washing machine? Would this be for a decorative, non-functioning laundry room? Or maybe just for appliance stores? angel

-handleman, CSWP (The new, easy test)

RE: floor loads

Do not post on the structural forum as this is a DIY project. This is a small project with no significant safety issues. You may want to sister some joists or add blocking between joist to help spread the concentrated load to adjacent joists, but without any real details there is not much other advice that can be offered. Pictures would probably get a lot more response.

RE: floor loads

Because the empty weight is what's in the datasheet, and that is more relevant for shipping and handling: http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdfImages/13/1349...

Since the capacity is 4.2 cuft, if that were all water, it would add 250 lb to the weight. I don't think they're anywhere near that full during operation, though.

TTFN (ta ta for now)
I can do absolutely anything. I'm an expert! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKorP55Aqvg
FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies forum1529: Translation Assistance for Engineers Entire Forum list http://www.eng-tips.com/forumlist.cfm

RE: floor loads

Ah... I was reading that as live load rating, as in lb/sf, rather than weight of the object itself. purpleface

-handleman, CSWP (The new, easy test)

RE: floor loads

(OP)
At this point, I'm only worried about the footings. As a traffic engineer, I haven't had many opportunities to get below the pavement. Is this an appropriate forum to ask for a design critique? I promise it's not homework!

RE: floor loads

The typical design live load for residential floors is 40 psf, which is fine for a residential type washing machine. If you want to go a bit heavier, consider 50 psf, which is equivalent to the loading for a parking garage for regular vehicles. Your footings likely also pick up roof loads which must be a counted for in the design. Many jurisdictions have tabulated, prescriptive requirements for this sort of thing, check your local building code.

RE: floor loads

Welcome to the Hobbies Forum SkiisAndBikes.
Bill

Bill
--------------------
"Why not the best?"
Jimmy Carter

RE: floor loads

What is a"mud room"???

For something like this I would go with the FGT (fat guy test). Build something which seems fairly strong then get a well built friend to come and do a"proof" test on it. If it doesn't crack or falk down you'll be ok.

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: floor loads

Mud Room. In rural areas the first room on entry. This is where you take off and store your muddy boots and outdoor clothes. This room often does double duty as a laundry room.

Bill
--------------------
"Why not the best?"
Jimmy Carter

RE: floor loads

That mud room is cleaner than my kitchen!

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: floor loads

(OP)
Thanks, folks!

SkiisAndBikes, I'm using 40 psf, plus assuming a future tile floor and using the full 40 psf ground snow load rather than the 30.8 that I get adjusting for roof pitch. I talked to the building department before, but another conversation wouldn't be a bad idea.

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!


Resources


Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close