INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Jobs

Springfield Massachusetts Residential Building Code - FIRST edition

Springfield Massachusetts Residential Building Code - FIRST edition

(OP)

I'm at a loss on this and am hoping someone out there might know if the city of Springfield MA had a residential building code in effect in the mid 1920s.

I am evaluating the roof on a single family home that has some issues and I'm curious about any prescriptive code requirements that might have existed at that time. The rafter-to-wall connection was done in a rather interesting manner and time has not been too kind to it. I suspect there were no explicit code requirements for a single family home, and before I make any statement that I might regret I thought I would pose the question.

The attached picture shows the condition. The double 2x top plate that the rafters bear on has rotated about the outer edge of the studs, causing the inner edge of the plate to lift off the studs. Note the similarity to balloon framing for the attic floor joists & wall studs.

The Home Inspector has decreed that this condition requires further evaluation by a P.E. The home is now owned by a bank and is in the hands of a broker to effect corrections so it can be sold.


Ralph
Structures Consulting
Northeast USA

RE: Springfield Massachusetts Residential Building Code - FIRST edition

Ralph....I would simply qualify any code related statements as not being explicitly verifiable and move on to a fix. Looks like a recurring minor thrust issue that was not recoverable from the connection configuration

RE: Springfield Massachusetts Residential Building Code - FIRST edition

I agree with Ron: move on to a fix. While I think it's fun to look at old codes, I don't think anything you'd find would change your situation. Some old diagram might help explain why it's built this way, but I don't think that would prompt you to say, "okay, it's fine because the 1920 code says so."

It would be interesting to see if other houses on the street have the same condition.

RE: Springfield Massachusetts Residential Building Code - FIRST edition

(OP)

I did not include any code related statement in my report, as both Ron & kipfoot are correct - move on to a solution. I was more curious as to whether there might be prescriptive requirements in the Code.

kipfoot - This is not a neighborhood where I would want to spend a lot of time, so examining other homes to satisfy my intellectual curiosity would not be my first choice.

I have recommended that the entire roof be removed down to the tops of the wall studs, then reconstructed using the appropriate wind tie-down hardware. Any contractor proposed alternative to removing the roof must be evaluated and approved by a license engineer.

Can't see how a contractor proposed solution that does not involve removing the roof will be more cost-effective, but then that will not be my problem (I hope).

Ralph
Structures Consulting
Northeast USA

RE: Springfield Massachusetts Residential Building Code - FIRST edition

If the ceiling joists align with and are parallel with the rafters, you could use a come-along to pull the roof back together and run a knee brace from each rafter to each ceiling joist.

RE: Springfield Massachusetts Residential Building Code - FIRST edition

(OP)

XR250 - I considered something like that, but to avoid buckling the sheathing, one would have to use a come-along at every rafter and pull simultaneously on all of them. What took decades to distort really shouldn't be forced back into alignment in a matter of a day or two. Also, one would not have the overhead clearance needed to beat each nail back down into the stud.

Obviously alternative methods could be acceptable as long as the end result meets the necessary criteria. No matter what, it's the total cost that will influence the method. The roofing may be nearing its end of life, and there are a number of penetrations to consider, so the R&R method may prove to be the most expedient.

Ralph
Structures Consulting
Northeast USA

RE: Springfield Massachusetts Residential Building Code - FIRST edition

I would get a contractor involved and see what they think. I have seen some pretty amazing feats performed with just a few come-alongs.

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!


Resources


Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close