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Using B16.5 Flange Bolting to Secure a Bracket

Using B16.5 Flange Bolting to Secure a Bracket

(OP)
Hello,

I would like to secure a bracket to a stud bolt on a B16.5 pipe flange. The bracket will be sandwiched between two hex nuts as shown in the attachment. I would like feedback on whether this approach is acceptable per ASME standard or code. I was unsuccessful finding anything in ASME B16.5 or ASME PCC-1 related to using a flange bolt in this manner.

Thanks in advance for your input.

RE: Using B16.5 Flange Bolting to Secure a Bracket

I suspect it's going to be one of many things which is neither part of a code so allowed, but not specifically banned.

Looking at your drawing I can't see it being a big issue or load on the flange but why is it not between the nut and flange? Saves another bolt and longer nut.

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: Using B16.5 Flange Bolting to Secure a Bracket

Quote (LittleInch)

why is it not between the nut and flange? Saves another bolt and longer nut.

Ability to remove and/or adjust orientation of the bracket without unloading the gasket?

RE: Using B16.5 Flange Bolting to Secure a Bracket

I would use a bracket with two bolt holes to stop it moving.

Look at pipe flange supports where lots of people use plate supports on bolt holes to support pipe and valves but they all go between the nut and the flange itself.

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: Using B16.5 Flange Bolting to Secure a Bracket

I would not use this approach as typically we (client) do not allow supporting one pipe from another without our consent on a ad-hoc basis with the main concern being different services/fluids with different temperatures and expansion rates. Unoffically IMO we do not want to give contractor carte blanche permission to take easy solution invariably not taking into account effect on parent lines.

We will however allow support to be bolted to flange particularly on GRE etc and typically at valve locations.

RE: Using B16.5 Flange Bolting to Secure a Bracket

Well, you might not like it, but this kind of thing is done all the time- and unless the bracket puts a substantial undesigned load on the piping, there's nothing really wrong with it. The flanged joint ends at the top surface of the 1st nut in my opinion, so B16.5 shouldn't care one way or another.

RE: Using B16.5 Flange Bolting to Secure a Bracket

(OP)
Thanks for providing input everyone it is appreciated.

LittleInch, the longer bolt and second nut provides the ability to adjust or remove the bracket without unloading the flange (just as jgKRI thought). I don't see this needing to happen but just in case. Thank for you for mentioning flange style pipe supports. I was unfamiliar with this product until now.

MickMc, in this case a second pipe will not be supported by this bracket. The item being secured is able to move with the flange as it moves.

moltenmetal, I was also interpreting the flange joint as ending at the top of the first nut.

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