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Finite element modelling of complex geotechnical structures

Finite element modelling of complex geotechnical structures

(OP)
Can finite element modelling of complex geotechnical structures result in cost savings to the clients?
usually structures like piled rafts are analysed separately, once only rafts are analysed and once only the piles, and then the results are compiled. if we use the softwares like Plaxis, can it help in better designs? and is there a market for this?

RE: Finite element modelling of complex geotechnical structures

"usually structures like piled rafts are analysed separately, once only rafts are analysed and once only the piles, and then the results are compiled. if we use the softwares like Plaxis, can it help in better designs?"

Almost reminds me of the Millenium (sp?) Towers in San Francisco.

Dik

RE: Finite element modelling of complex geotechnical structures

(OP)
hi Dik,

A good case study for me, the Millennium tower. Do you agree that a detailed finite element analysis of such complex structures can result in better designs?

Bilal

RE: Finite element modelling of complex geotechnical structures

I work for a highway department. We have design-build contracts. Design-builders' geotechnical consultants often use finite element/difference modeling to optimize design.

Consider monitoring data from a ground-improvement project. What if it doesn't add up? In what method would you strive to figure out what the data is telling the engineers? I'd certainly consider modeling what's know to learn what may be unknown (i.e., to result in the monitoring data you have).

I've used finite element modeling to evaluate seepage through an embankment dam (visual mudflow).

We've seen finite element modeling for retaining wall design. Complex stuff - i.e,. the retaining wall runs for a thousand feet, but there's a 200 ft wide bridge in one section. Is it appropriate to use the bridge beam reactions, how do they inform the stability, etc.

I'm in the midst of evaluating a ground improvement project where there is 15 inches of lateral movement beyond the limit of the PVD/surcharge domain. We assembled a finite element model to tease out various options in what's really going on.

So, yes, it's a tool that belongs in the box.

f-d

ípapß gordo ainÆt no madre flaca!

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