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GPM VS PSI

GPM VS PSI

(OP)
All
I have the following: 3.834 tube i.d., with 280 gpm (assuming water).
I need to know the psi running thru this system, nothing seems cut and dried, pressure drop is miniscule
things are off the charts in Crane's

any direction would be nice...
as always thank you

RE: GPM VS PSI

2.4 psi/100 ft.

Good luck,
Latexman

To a ChE, the glass is always full - 1/2 air and 1/2 water.

RE: GPM VS PSI

The question doesn't make sense. The pressure could be all over the board. Do you mean the pressure drop as a result of friction loss in the pipe?

RE: GPM VS PSI

(OP)
Ya I know BronYrAur
I am 3rd or 7th down the line away from the designers on this.
we are not the pump people on this one. all I want to see is the PSI to make sure our connections can hold up
to the requirements. All I know is 3.834 i.d. X .083 wall tubing, with clamp connections
customer is designing the system for 280 gpm output, I am not concerned with pressure drop (again not the pump guys)
looking at 20' long spool sections.
assuming water at ambient temp.
I really don't know much more.....

thank you for replying

RE: GPM VS PSI

There is just no way to answer that. Static head adds pressure to the system with zero flow. Let's say you have a 100 story building at 10' per floor. You have approx 430 psi in the pipe at the bottom of that building with zero gpm. The pump than adds pressure on top of that. Now let's say you have a short open tank and you are drawing 280 gpm from it. The pressure in that suction piping will only be a few psi. Flow alone is not enough to answer your question on the pressure that the pipe walls will experience.

RE: GPM VS PSI

BronYrAur is correct, there is no way to answer your question. At best we can help you get a pressure drop per 100 foot of pipe.
You need to straight up ask the pump guys what the incoming pressure is. It could be 10 psi or 300 psi.

RE: GPM VS PSI

Google relation between water flow and pressure
to get pressure difference required to produce the exit velocity.

RE: GPM VS PSI

(OP)
Thank all of you for your responses
the pump guys/designers came thru with an answer....

RE: GPM VS PSI

Which was???

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: GPM VS PSI

(OP)
feed pressure = 50-60 psig......tada....

thanx

RE: GPM VS PSI

Outlet pressure = ????

" 3.834 i.d. X .083 wall tubing, with clamp connections
"
Do you understand "tubing" is NOT "pipe" and has different charactoeristics for analysis and code-approved designs? What is your background and experience?

What fluid?

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