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Hammer a vessel's seams during hydro?

Hammer a vessel's seams during hydro?

(OP)
I'm looking at a 1952 drawing of a CS, 100 psig, vertical, 10'-6" dia. x 18'-10" tall pressure vessel with 2:1 elliptical heads. General note says "125 psi hydrostatic, at which hammer all welds and conn. with a 6 lb. hammer, then 150 psi." Why? Just curious.

Good luck,
Latexman

To a ChE, the glass is always full - 1/2 air and 1/2 water.

RE: Hammer a vessel's seams during hydro?

Dunno, I have seen reference to the hammer test on old work as well, kinda scary :)

The problem with sloppy work is that the supply FAR EXCEEDS the demand

RE: Hammer a vessel's seams during hydro?

Low temperature toughness rules were only introduced into the Code in the 1980's. This was a very simple way of insuring that there was adequate ductility at the test temperature (by introducing an impact-type loading).

Crude - yup. But it seemed to work for close to 60 years.

RE: Hammer a vessel's seams during hydro?

Hammering was also a means of checking soundness of welds under pressure.

RE: Hammer a vessel's seams during hydro?

So what happened when the welds where not sound and failed the hammer test?

Did the hammer guy have wear a rain coat?

RE: Hammer a vessel's seams during hydro?

Fortunately, the result of a failure under a properly designed hydrotest was likely limited to getting wet. Regrettably of course it is much more difficult to do a properly designed test than to do an improper one with a huge pad of trapped gas. At 100 psig, the result was likely still merely getting wet, unless the vessel was very large indeed.

RE: Hammer a vessel's seams during hydro?

(OP)
∫ PdV for an incompressible fluid is very small.

Good luck,
Latexman

To a ChE, the glass is always full - 1/2 air and 1/2 water.

RE: Hammer a vessel's seams during hydro?

Molten. I think you mean Unless the pressure is very high!

General Blr. CA,USA

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