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Thermal insulation between two metal components

Thermal insulation between two metal components

(OP)
Hi,
I have the machine component which size is 2m x 0.2m x 0.4m (component is sorounded by enclosure, as outlined on attached draft).
Component has a couple of metal braided cables which have their inlets along the longer side (2 meters).
Component is made of mild steel and its working temperature may reach 250degC.

I am developing a new system for the cables collection along the 2 meter side of the component.
The difficulty is that I need to fix this system to this component (it cannot be fixed elsewhere) and simultaneously I need to thermally insulate this system from the hot component.
Component is disassembled periodically (every 6 weeks) from the machine for refurbishment, thus its construct, that includes also cables collecting system, must be properly designed from design-for-assembly perspective.

I consider a system as outlined on the attached draft.
It is quite simple. However, I am not certain how to effectively thermally insulate the system (in my design a part called 'ring', see draft) from the mild steel component. One option seems to be a ring made from material of lowest thermal conductivity but capable to withstand ~280degC.

P.S. In presented concept each ring is inserted on a threaded mild steel bar which is already present in component design.


Please help.

Thank you
Regards



RE: Thermal insulation between two metal components

Have you checked with Fabreeka to see if they have something suitable?

Dik

RE: Thermal insulation between two metal components

So, start looking at low thermal conductivity materials - stainless steel, titanium alloy 6Al4V, or engineering polymers like PEEK, polyimide (Kapton). You might look at some sources like McMaster-Carr for existing support clamps in various materials.

RE: Thermal insulation between two metal components

The simplest solution is to attach the rings to the main object with standoffs, e.g. long-ish studs, instead of bolting the rings directly. So the thermal transfer mechanism of conduction is impeded by the length of the standoff.
... and further by its material, e.g. stainless steel.
... and transfer by radiation can be impeded by a sheet metal barrier.

Mike Halloran
Pembroke Pines, FL, USA

RE: Thermal insulation between two metal components

AligatorAmy,

Does this thing run continuously? If it does, the main box heats up. It heats your connections, which heats your cable conduit. The whole thing reaches equilibrium, which dictates the temperature of your cables. Maybe what you need to do is attach fins to your cable conduit, and aim a fan at it.

--
JHG

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