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Stainless Steel nameplate for subsea equipment

Stainless Steel nameplate for subsea equipment

(OP)
What is the best practice for attaching a stainless steel nameplate to a carbon steel structure that will be used sub-sea. The carbon frame utilises a sacrificial anode for corrosion protection. If the name plate is isolated it will corrode. Should the plate just be bolted or screwed to the frame?

Thanks

RE: Stainless Steel nameplate for subsea equipment

I would carefully choose the stainless steel (not an austenitic grade, or perhaps not even stainless at all but a non-ferro), and (if stainless steel) isolate it / place it far enough from the CS in order to avoid a galvanic cell.

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RE: Stainless Steel nameplate for subsea equipment

Would brass or bronze be a better choice?

Dik

RE: Stainless Steel nameplate for subsea equipment

Naval brass or Al bronze would be my choice, or a high alloy stainless (which is overkill).

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P.E. Metallurgy, Plymouth Tube

RE: Stainless Steel nameplate for subsea equipment

(OP)
Thanks. I am used to designing top side equipment to DNV 2.7-3 standards. We have always used 316L s.steel plates however I will look into the Naval Brass for the subsea stuff.

Cheers

RE: Stainless Steel nameplate for subsea equipment

Many types of stainless are affected by chlorides and chloride type compounds.

Dik

RE: Stainless Steel nameplate for subsea equipment

You could also use 90-10 Cu-Ni, or if you want to get exotic Monel 400.
The advantage of Cu alloys is that marine growth will be much less on them and you can actually find them later.

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P.E. Metallurgy, Plymouth Tube

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