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Hello Everybody, Anybody has any

Hello Everybody, Anybody has any

(OP)
Hello Everybody,

Anybody has any information of the H bridge rectifier, i need to understand basically how it functions comparing to the full wave rectifier.

Thanks,

Samer

RE: Hello Everybody, Anybody has any

How are you defining a "full wave rectifier" that is not an H-bridge?


"You measure the size of the accomplishment by the obstacles you had to overcome to reach your goals" -- Booker T. Washington

RE: Hello Everybody, Anybody has any

Push-pull rectifier perhaps? Very poor utilisation of the transformer.

RE: Hello Everybody, Anybody has any

I will take a guess that you are asking how a rectifier with a transistor as well as a diode in each leg compares to one with just a diode in each leg. Both have an "H" topology.

The rectifier with just diodes is usually termed a "passive" rectifier, without any ability to actively control when and how it passes current to the DC side. It typically "gulps" current at the peaks of the AC input waveforms. This does lousy things to the power quality of the system.

The rectifier with transistors as well in the legs can be a "active" rectifier. It is essentially the same as an inverter, but usually acting in "(re)generation" mode. By controlling the duty cycle of the transistors, it can much more smoothly take power from the AC input. Of course, this extra capability and complexity costs a lot more.

Curt Wilson
Omron Delta Tau

RE: Hello Everybody, Anybody has any

The full wave rectifier converts AC to DC.
There is an "H" bridge configuration with switched diodes that is used to reverse the polarity of the DC applied to the load such as a small motor.

Bill
--------------------
"Why not the best?"
Jimmy Carter

RE: Hello Everybody, Anybody has any

An H-bridge usually is a four-quadrant set of power transistors (Bipolar, MOFET, IGBT etcetera) that is used in DC applications to control a DC (servo)motor. It is so easy to google that I don't offer a LMGTFY. I wouldn't even call it a rectifier - because it is not.

Gunnar Englund
www.gke.org
--------------------------------------
Half full - Half empty? I don't mind. It's what in it that counts.

RE: Hello Everybody, Anybody has any

I'm wondering if he meant a "Cascaded H Bridge" rectifier used on MV drives, as compared to a standard diode bridge rectifier. But I'm guessing...


"You measure the size of the accomplishment by the obstacles you had to overcome to reach your goals" -- Booker T. Washington

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