INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Jobs

Evaporation of water liquid in very hot air (above water critical temperature)

Evaporation of water liquid in very hot air (above water critical temperature)

Evaporation of water liquid in very hot air (above water critical temperature)

(OP)
I am studying the evaporation process of water liquid droplet situated in very high gas temperature, and trying to calculate the wet bulb temperature where the liquid will evaporate.
At more common condition of temperature below the critical temperature, the wet bulb temperature is calculated based on the difference in water vapor pressure on liquid surface to that in the surrounding hot air. However, if the air temperature is higher than that, the water (in the continuous phase) is no more vapour but gas (cannot be compressed into liquid), thus the concept of "vapour pressure" does not exist.
How can we measure the droplet evaporation (wet bulb) temperature in such condition?

RE: Evaporation of water liquid in very hot air (above water critical temperature)

If you're above the temperature where a water phase exists, there is no condensation possible. The highest "wet bulb" temperature achievable is therefore the critical temperature of water, the point at which the "vapour pressure" becomes undefined.

But unless the PRESSURE is also above the critical pressure, the condensation temperature of a water/noncondensibles mixture is always the temperature at which the vapour pressure of water equals the PARTIAL PRESSURE of water vapour in the mixture.

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!


Resources


Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close