INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Jobs

Solidworks in kitchen design

Solidworks in kitchen design

(OP)
Does anyone here use solidworks for kitchen designing and for the cnc output?
How do you do the nesting and optimisation of your different materials(muf double sided white for the carcass etc)
(Does the cam software do that by it's self ?)
Also tips please on how you have set up your basic models?
Through a design sheet or just straight configurations ?
Any and all advice appreciated
Thanks

RE: Solidworks in kitchen design

I did some consulting work a few years back for a company that did just that.
Except I showed them how to use solidworks for the cabinet design and master layouts. They took the data into their CAM package and used its functionality to create the nesting.

The way I approached it with them was create a master model/assembly approach for each cabinet type. Then we wrote programs with input forms for them to input sizes, door types, etc.

For each door type (i.e. slab, different raised panel types, etc) i created master assembly models and parts. The cabinet assembly would be built with a base cabinet, and would insert the desired doors and mate them in place.

Once created, drawings were generated and the models were exported to CAM where they would be cut out and drilled based on hardware selections.

Regards,
Jon

RE: Solidworks in kitchen design

(OP)
Thanks John for the info
That is kinda what I was thinking would probably be the case .😎
Master model with many configurations I presume ?

RE: Solidworks in kitchen design

I would use a "master sketch" and save each one as a different files instead of using Configs, especially if you have multiple users.

"Art without engineering is dreaming; Engineering without art is calculating."

Have you read FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies to make the best use of these Forums?

RE: Solidworks in kitchen design

Well some of the parts had configurations but the dimensions and such were all controlled through the program.

A better way to do it would be have templates and rules based configurators.. like rulestream or driveworks.

Regards,
Jon

RE: Solidworks in kitchen design

I standardized the cabinet parts. You can break down the standard cabinet into a basic set of parts. A base cabinet has side panels, bottom panel, back panel, and stretchers. My base cabinet has the option for 2, 3, or 4 drawers, or doors. The top cabinets follow the same concept, but no drawers. The advantage of creating them as parts is you can tool path each part and import that directly into a cut file assembly. I tried using master sketches, but your time creating tool paths becomes much longer. I use CamWorks, and while it has automatic feature recognition, it is far from perfect for woodwork parts. I can post some pics if you want.

I am not a full time SW guy, so I am sure many (likely most) of you are far more experienced.

Is this for a client or is this a one off for yourself? In all honesty, for a cabinet manuf, this is not the best software to use. The amount of hardware options in the woodwork industry is vast, and keeping it up to date is a big job. That said, if the company does a lot of odd tasks, it can be a very good option.

RE: Solidworks in kitchen design

Mine was for a customer, a cabinet maker, back when I was working as an application engineer for Solidworks reseller. And yes that was clear at the time that the amount of hardware options could be daunting. If you are serious about pursuing something like that, you should take a look at rulestream. Rather than a master model approach they actually do new feature creation programmatically. Its pretty powerful stuff but its also a bit of an investment but with a pretty decent ROI.

Regards,
Jon

RE: Solidworks in kitchen design

Driveworks xpress is built into SW. Might try using that, its bascially the same thing as Rulestream.

Scott Baugh, CSWP pc2
CAD Systems Manager
Evapar

www.evapar.com

Quote:

"If it's not broke, Don't fix it!"
FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies

RE: Solidworks in kitchen design

Yeah thats an option, but its pretty limited at the express level.. and it can only do dimensional and configurative changes.. Rulestream is the only one I know of that can do feature creation from scratch based on a set of rules.

Regards,
Jon

RE: Solidworks in kitchen design

But to do that you have to buy rulestream correct? If so, then driveworks is a something to be researched and compared to especially if they are going to have to pay for either one to do what they want.

I seen rulestream many years ago when they first came out. Don't misunderstand me, I like rule stream they have a good product, but so does driveworks. So I am just making sure everyone knows what is out there.

Scott Baugh, CSWP pc2
CAD Systems Manager
Evapar

www.evapar.com

Quote:

"If it's not broke, Don't fix it!"
FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies

RE: Solidworks in kitchen design

I was reviewing the driveworks demos. This seems very efficient for the modeling, but how might one set this up so the part tool paths are included and you do not need to tool path the parts for each assembly? Creating the tool paths using the automatic feature recognition works well if the parts are simple shapes, but blind 1/2 dado joints are common, and Camworks does not auto create the pockets for those very well. Creating the tool path sketches and then making the pockets takes a little time, and if you have sheets and sheets of parts to cut it can turn into a lot of time where it is very easy to make a mistake.

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!


Resources


Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close