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portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

(OP)
Should the "P" in Portland always be capitalized when referencing the material in an engineering report (geotechnical report)? I've always capitalized it, but recently found that some engineers don't.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

I suspect that since the word 'portland' is not an actual brand name but rather a generic designation for the type of cement, that there is no reason to capitalize it.

That being said, most spellcheckers will nonetheless try to get you to capitalize it since the assumption is that it's referring to the name of at least one of two major US cities.

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

Or even to an island attached to Southern England!

A.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

(OP)
See, I thought it was supposed to be capitalized because of it is called "Portland" cement concrete because it is named after that island, which is proper...I suppose either way might be okay.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

Wikipedia capitalizes Portland cement and since it is derived from a proper name the rules of grammar say it should be capitalized.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

I like it capitalized, but there is not unanimity, even by folks like the Portland Cement Association.

http://www.concretethinker.com/detail/History-Port...

Since it was named for the Isle of Portland, I think that seals it.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

Ah, but we don't capitalize, "Zipper!"

f-d

ípapß gordo ainÆt no madre flaca!

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

But we typically capitalise the C in Coriolis meter but units of measure are always spelt out with lower case (eg pascals (Pa) newtons (N)). I think that if we try to assign a rule there will be as many exceptions to the rule.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

I think Pascal and Newton deserve to be capitalized. I know that convention, but think it is incongruous to capitalize the abbreviation and not the whole name.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

Yes, units based on names should be capitalized, including the abbreviation. For example Hertz and Hz.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

Sorry Compositepro, but that's not correct.

SI Units which are named after people are spelt in full in lower-case, but the symbol is generally capitalised; e.g.:

Hz = hertz
N = newton
A = ampere
K = kelvin

Perhaps surprisingly, the correct unit names and capitalisation for the other two common measures of temperature degrees are the "degree Celsius" (°C) and the "degree Fahrenheit" (°F) - this is because the full name of the unit is the "degree Celsius" or "degree Fahrenheit", both of which have a leading lower-case "d", and the proper name follows, and is therefore capitalised. The kelvin is just the "kelvin", not the "degree Kelvin". You may think this is silly, but it is what it is!

http://julianh72.blogspot.com

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

It is silly, and needs to be changed. I'm never lending my name to a unit unless they capitalize it. But then, I don't think any of those people were asked for permission.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

Bah humbug. It's a Watt, a Volt, and an Ampere (but merely an amp).

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

I'm afraid that most of those people were long dead before they decided to use their names as units of whatever.

And until Ronald Reagan (AKA "Saint Ronald") came along, it was tradition to NOT name anything after someone until AFTER they had died. Since then we've had all sorts of examples of 'memorializing' individuals for whom there has not yet actually been any memorials for.

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

Far from being a Saint...

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

@hokie66:

"I'm never lending my name to a unit unless they capitalize it."

An interesting point of view from somebody who has an all-lower-case user-name!

I suggest the "hokie" (or should that be the "Hokie"?) as a unit of measurement of controversial content in an internet forum thread, where 66 hokies is defined as being sufficiently controversial to sustain diametrically opposing points of view, yet ultimately having no real significance whatsoever.

http://julianh72.blogspot.com

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

Now, now, Julian. The word "hokie" is admittedly sometimes capitalized, but it is just a coined word which means a loyal supporter of my university, Virginia Tech. It is not a proper name, so I don't capitalize it. As to the diametrically opposing points of view, it would take far less than 66 of us to make you correct.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

I was on campus, week before last! Go Hokies!

f-d, M.Eng., '86

ípapß gordo ainÆt no madre flaca!

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

At my Alma Mater, Michigan Tech, while it was never an 'official' title for a tech student or graduate, the generally-accepted term of endearment was "toot". Now the history behind how this came about has been much debated, however, the explanation that most people sight when asked about it was that when the university was first established in 1885 and the locals were told that it was going to be training 'engineers' they immediately assumed that these would be the people who 'drove' locomotives, which led to them giving the students the nickname of "toots". At least that's the most popular story behind the name winky smile

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

I stand corrected. I remember investigating the question of capitalization 30 or 40 fears ago, but apparently do not remember the answer well. And either way there are lots of exceptions to the rule.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

@johnrbaker: cite.
@hokie66: But you'd be a, "Fighting Gobbler," eh?

f-d

ípapß gordo ainÆt no madre flaca!

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

That's correct, fattdad. We were the VPI Fighting Gobblers (turkeys) when I was there. The term "hokie" has only come into more general use since the name of the University was changed, and Virginia Tech Hokies is now commonly used.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

At Michigan Tech our official mascot was the 'Husky' (what else would you expect when there have been recorded snowfalls in all 12 months of the year).

http://www.mtu.edu/webcams/plaza/motion.html

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

When I attended Lehigh University we were the Engineers (imagination evidently being in short supply) but now they are the Mountain Hawks. The colors are still a rather depressing brown and white.

----------------------------------------

The Help for this program was created in Windows Help format, which depends on a feature that isn't included in this version of Windows.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

Being originally a school of mines, the colors of my alma mater were Silver and Gold, which sounds cool but which didn't always translate well when used in some sort of public display. The joke was that while the Gold was OK, that only when the Silver was sufficiently 'tarnished' did it provide enough of a contrast for things like sport uniforms and the such.

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

Back to cement and capitalization -
When I have this type of question, I look for a reputable source. The Portland Cement Association does not capitalize portland cement. If it is good enough for them, it's good enough for me. See http://www.cement.org/cement-concrete-basics/concr...

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

"portland" is the process of making this type of cement. The nomenclature does not refer directly to a place but to the process. Don't capitalize.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

I think the name does refer to a place, the Isle of Portland. So, like the Bessemer process, I prefer "Portland process".

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

Good point, hokie66. Hadn't thought of comparing those two processes. Yes, the Isle of Portland is correct, just was taught in CE Materials class long ago that it shouldn't be capitalized so I stuck with that. Dr. Byron Ruth (RIP) would be proud!!

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

I always assumed Portland cement was so called as it resembled the colour of (expensive) Portland stone which came from Portland. (S. England).

www.tynevalleyplastics.co.uk

Politicians like to panic, they need activity. It is their substitute for achievement.

RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

Nouns can transition from proper to common and vice-versa through usage. Apparently becoming common and dropping the capitalisation is an accolade.


The excerpt below is from 'The story of ‘STENT’: From noun to verb' by Surender Deaora

This story of stent, which started as proper noun to an adjective to a common noun and finally as a verb to describe an action, seems likely to be originated from the dentist Charles Thomas Stent, although the other obsolete English and Scottish meaning may also be there. We do not know whether the family surname Stent might have been originated from the original Scottish or an Oxford English meaning but if it is there, then both the alternatives are correct. Today, the word stent is now generic and the greatest accolade by medical fraternity to the inventor Charles Stent is given by dropping capital “S” and using the lowercase “s” in the word stent, although inadvertently.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC48670...




RE: portland cement concrete or Portland cement concrete

(OP)
I've decided that I will not capitalize it.

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