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Centrifugal Pump

Centrifugal Pump

(OP)


An outstanding feature of a horizontal or vertical centrifugal pump is the relation of discharge to pressure at constant speed???????

Please explain briefly........

RE: Centrifugal Pump

Please re-word your question and convince me you're not a student.

I realize English may not be your first language, but this is a serious engineering site.

Relation? A relation is a person like an aunt or uncle. relationship maybe?

Even assuming it's relationship, the next words don't make sense "discharge to pressure at constant speed"

discharge what? discharge pressure, flow, velocity?
Pressure? - which pressure? where?

Last point - tell us what YOU think it is and then we'll tell you if you're wrong.

This site is called Eng Tips, not Eng-answers....

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: Centrifugal Pump

?

It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts. (Sherlock Holmes - A Scandal in Bohemia.)

RE: Centrifugal Pump

Ok,

What I think you're getting at is that a centrifugal pump differential head (pressure is dependent on density of the fluid) at a fixed speed remains the same regardless of the inlet head.

So a pump at fixed speed generates a differential head of say 150m.
Assuming NOTHING changes between one and the other.
With inlet head of 100m, discharge head is 250m
With inlet head of 200m, discharge head is 350m

Was that the question?

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: Centrifugal Pump

..that is, when the pressure head is increased, the discharge is decreased.


Link to Book Text

RE: Centrifugal Pump

Ha, it still makes no sense when written in full.

"Pressure head"??

Why it is an "outstanding feature" for a fire pump is not made clear and the English is terrible.

What it is trying and failing to say is that a centrifugal pump is, in essence, a constant pressure machine and flowrate can vary a lot (say 20% to 100%) whilst pressure only varies from 100% to 80%.

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: Centrifugal Pump

so what is his question?
Seems his question was lifted directly from the text bimr pointed out - so - my suggestion to the OP is to read all of it.

It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts. (Sherlock Holmes - A Scandal in Bohemia.)

RE: Centrifugal Pump

Sounds like a student asking a question to a passage in the text book smile

RE: Centrifugal Pump

Whatever the question, the answer seems to be "look at a pump curve."

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