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UP - An amazing word

UP - An amazing word

UP - An amazing word

(OP)
There is a two-letter word in English has more meanings than any other two-letter word, and that word is 'UP.' It is listed in the dictionary as an adverb, preposition, adjective, noun or verb.

It's easy to understand UP, meaning toward the sky or at the top of the list, but when we awaken in the morning, why do we wake UP?

At a meeting, why does a topic come UP? Why do we speak UP, and why are politicians UP for election and why is it UP to the secretary to write UP a report? We call UP our friends, brighten UP a room, polish UP the silver, warm UP the leftovers and clean UP the kitchen. We lock UP the house and fix UP an old car.

At other times, this little word has real special meaning. People stir UP trouble, line UP for tickets, work UP an appetite, and think UP excuses.

To be dressed is one thing but to be dressed UP is special.

And this UP is confusing: A drain must be opened UP because it is stopped UP.

We open UP a store in the morning but we close it UP at night. We seem to be pretty mixed UP about UP!

To be knowledgeable about the proper uses of UP, look UP the word UP in the dictionary. In a desk-sized dictionary, it takes UP almost 1/4 of the page and can add UP to about thirty definitions.

If you are UP to it, you might try building UP a list of the many ways UP is used. It will take UP a lot of your time, but if you don't give UP, you may wind UP with 100 or more.

When it threatens to rain, we say it is clouding UP. When the sun comes out, we say it is clearing UP. When it rains, the earth soaks it UP. When it does not rain for awhile, things dry UP. One could go on and on, but I'll wrap it UP, for now ... my time is UP!

Oh ... one more thing: What is the first thing you do in the morning and the last thing you do at night?

U P!

Did that one crack you UP?

Don't screw UP. Send this on to everyone you look UP in your address book ... or not ... it's UP to you.

Now I'll shut UP!

forumtowers.com

RE: UP - An amazing word

And here I had always been told that 'IF' was the most powerful two-letter word in the English language, with 'NO' running a close second winky smile

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: UP - An amazing word

I believe "why" is probably the most powerful single utterance in English. It can immediately bring to an ubrupt stop the greatest load of nonsense being spoken, it can stop people in their tracks - or on the other hand, start a major review / investigation following a "why".

However the OP is correct "up" is certainly an interesting and much used word, usually having the largest entry in a dictionary.

It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts. (Sherlock Holmes - A Scandal in Bohemia.)

RE: UP - An amazing word

Speaking of another two-letter word, I understand that nailing down the definition of 'OR' will burn a few brain cells as well.

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: UP - An amazing word

To add a little more confusion, the Online Etymology Dictionary says that adverb UP comes from the ProtoIndoEuropean root *upo, which generated the Greek HYPO (meaning "under" or "below") and the similar Latin SUB.

RE: UP - An amazing word

ifupiscanorbe?

Mike McCann, PE, SE (WA)


RE: UP - An amazing word

Nice OP!

I eschew the word, "Why!" It immediately evokes defensiveness in most instances.

Run is a word with many definitions also.

f-d

ípapß gordo ainÆt no madre flaca!

RE: UP - An amazing word

Interesting that in maybe half of those phrases the word UP can be omitted without a change in the meaning.

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