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What's the proper way to call out a tabulation block?

What's the proper way to call out a tabulation block?

(OP)
We need to make a bunch of parts and they're all exactly the same except for one hole. About 50 have a .060" hole and the other 50 have a .039" hole. What's the best way to call out 2 different dimensions for the "same" part/feature? Tabulation blocks?

Do you dimension the hole with "A" and then just have 2 different dimensions in a table? Or is there a different way to call it out?

RE: What's the proper way to call out a tabulation block?

I don't know what a 'tabulation block' is. Do you mean a hole table?

In either case, it sounds to me like these parts should have separate part numbers. Which means separate drawings.

RE: What's the proper way to call out a tabulation block?

Your tabulation block should have at least two columns, Part Number and DIM "A".

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RE: What's the proper way to call out a tabulation block?

What the other two said. Two column table with two part numbers and dimensions for dimension A on your drawing or two separate drawings that only differ by one dimension. Either way it's definitely two part numbers if you go by the fit, form, or function rule.

RE: What's the proper way to call out a tabulation block?

I once saw a hole chart on a drawing that was actually titled "TABULATION TABLE". smile

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RE: What's the proper way to call out a tabulation block?

echelontf,

I'll echo previous responses and say that a tabular tabulation table is likely the best approach.

Another approach I've seen used, particularly in cases where only a single dimension is variable, is to directly use the numerical value of the dimension (in appropriate units such as thousandths of inches) as the part number suffix (dash number). A drawing note would explain the scheme.

Quote (example drawing note)

Part number: 12345-XXX where XXX is the numerical value of dimension A in thousandths of an inch.

I'm not sure what, if anything, ASME has to say about this method. If anyone happens to know, I'd be interested to hear.

pylfrm

RE: What's the proper way to call out a tabulation block?

Do you have 50 different shape drawings each with a hole size option? Then use a '-' numbered part scheme, -1 for the .060 hole and -2 for the .039 hole on each of the 50 drawings.

If more of the shape can be tabulated, you can reduce the number of drawings.

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