×
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!
  • Students Click Here

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Students Click Here

Jobs

Base Plate Design

Base Plate Design

Base Plate Design

(OP)
Hello, My name is Daniel.
I am designing a base plate connected to a pad foundation with a grade beam on top of the pad footing. I have a axial load and moment transfering to the foundation. I found a page that says that when moments act at a foundation, it is normal to replace them by a vertical load and an equivalent eccentricity. I would like to know the reason behind this. Thank you very much for your help

RE: Base Plate Design

Well each moment M can be replaced by force F and an eccentricity e
M = F x e


best regards
Klaus

RE: Base Plate Design

I'm not sure of the real reason, other than it gives a location for the placement of any foundations... Should be centered on the eccentric location.

Dik

RE: Base Plate Design

one reason might be...
if the (resulting) force is acting within the core section....the foundation will not turn over and there is no gap
between foundation and ground
therefor an existing moment can be transferred to force to see if this force is within this core area


best regards
Klaus

RE: Base Plate Design

(OP)
I understand that a point load with a eccentricity is equal to a moment. But on the picture, The point load with the eccentricity is being equal to a moment and also an axial load at the moment's location.
Shouldnt It just be equal to the moment?



Thanks for your help.

RE: Base Plate Design

The moment is CAUSED by the vertical load, that does not mean that the vertical load goes away

RE: Base Plate Design

Well, to start off, your resultant uniform pressure diagram to the bearing plate is wrong.

It is more triangular in nature with the resultant at the kern of the triangular pressure prism, giving a greater eccentricity.

There is a good diagram and example in Blodgett's "Design of Welded Structures" on how to analyze the problem on pages 3.3-8 through 3.3-10.

I suggest you look there to start.

There are more complex models, but the equations listed do give a solution.

Mike McCann, PE, SE (WA)


RE: Base Plate Design

Mike... I usually use a rectangular stress block like I do for reinforced concrete...

Dik

RE: Base Plate Design

Mike, the diagram is from AISC's Design Guide 1.

Since the column is embedded in a grade beam, I might design the grade beam and column to grade beam connection to take the moment (unless is a tie beam rather than a grade beam designed for bending).

RE: Base Plate Design

Well, if this is accepted practice now, then it is less conservative than 50 years or so ago when Blodget did his sketch, ultimately yielding a thinner base plate.

Mike McCann, PE, SE (WA)


Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!


Resources


Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close