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Centrifugal Pump Suction vs discharge nozzle

Centrifugal Pump Suction vs discharge nozzle

(OP)
Hello,

I came across a centrifugal pump with suction nozzle and discharge nozzle having the same size (12 in each), I know that for centrifugal pumps, suction nozzle is usually smaller the discharge one.

For what purpose does pump constructor go to such design ?

Thank you in advance

RE: Centrifugal Pump Suction vs discharge nozzle

This was done on some older vertical in-line pumps. These pumps were literally designed to be dropped into an existing line to boost pressure. You could cut out a section of a line and weld flanges on the ends. The pump could be bolted to those flanges and did not require any foundation. It would hang off the pipes. In order for this to work, the suction and discharge flanges were the same size and directly in line with one another. Is this the configuration of your pump? 12 inch flanges seem large for a pump of this type.

Johnny Pellin

RE: Centrifugal Pump Suction vs discharge nozzle

(OP)
Thank you for youe quick reply,

Actually, this pump will be installed on an existing pipes, would it be safe to say that supplying a pump with such design is not unconventional ?

This pump will be discharging water from a water pit into a sand filter in a water treatment plant (Head = 9 m)

RE: Centrifugal Pump Suction vs discharge nozzle

In general, the suction nozzle is typically larger than the discharge nozzle for NPSH and velocity issues.

In some applications, the suction nozzle and the discharge nozzle may be the same size. There are a number of pump manufacturers that offer horizontal spilt case pumps with the same size on both discharge and suction. Vertical turbine pumps may have the same size suction as the discharge.

RE: Centrifugal Pump Suction vs discharge nozzle

I don't see any problem with this arrangement. It is not unconventional. For a simple, relatively low head water application, I would not be concerned.

Johnny Pellin

RE: Centrifugal Pump Suction vs discharge nozzle

It is not uncommon to see pumps with the same size suction and discharge nozzle. A pump manufacturer can tell you why they do it. I am not sure why you care? As long as your suction and discharge velocity in the piping is within the recommended limits you are okay.

RE: Centrifugal Pump Suction vs discharge nozzle

Just don't install it backwards.

RE: Centrifugal Pump Suction vs discharge nozzle

Just don't install it backwards.

lol

RE: Centrifugal Pump Suction vs discharge nozzle

It's OK if you install it backwards, simply run it in the opposite direction 😁

It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts. (Sherlock Holmes - A Scandal in Bohemia.)

RE: Centrifugal Pump Suction vs discharge nozzle

(OP)
Thanks everyone for your feedback

I am new to the world of pumps and it was an odd thing to me, so I wanted to share with you.

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