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Drafting Standard Sheet Sizes and Plot Size

Drafting Standard Sheet Sizes and Plot Size

(OP)
Can anyone tell me what the industry standard is for plotting drawings? For example, drawings that are on D size paper (22"x34") such as plot plans, site plans, etc.. Are they normally produced on D size templates and plotted half scale to B size (11"x17") paper, or are they produced on B size paper and printed full scale to B size paper?

We are having an internal discussion and there is some back and forth about which way is typically done.

RE: Drafting Standard Sheet Sizes and Plot Size

I don't have exact percentage, but big part of the "industry" doesn't care and another equally big part doesn't know how to set-up printer correctly.

So, any kind of "plotting standard" is as good as non-existent.

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RE: Drafting Standard Sheet Sizes and Plot Size

(OP)
To me it makes more sense to stick to the sheet size the drawing should be (i.e., D size for plot plans) and print half scale. That way you still have the ability to print full D size if you need to further down the road.

RE: Drafting Standard Sheet Sizes and Plot Size

DGrayPPD,

Yesterday, I plotted an E sized drawing 1:1, and I hung it up on my wall. Nearby, I have some triangular drafting scales, so I can take measurements directly off the drawing. I am aware of a site that has an A size and B size drawing template. Their biggest printer is B size. D size is a hypothetical capability. You are better off with a good B template that you print to scale.

When building drawing templates, leave a 1/2" or 12mm border around the outside. I have done several templates with the narrowest borders the printer could use, thus maximizing space on the drawing. Then, we got new printers that did not support the old borders.

--
JHG

RE: Drafting Standard Sheet Sizes and Plot Size

thread1103-420471: Sheet sizing standards touched on this.

I prefer to use the full range of format shapes, with some concession to larger font size for when printed smaller. I think I gave more details in that thread.

Typical B size format takes up way to much real estate for it to be very useful and leads to lots of multi sheet drawings which I find harder to work with, I prefer one larger drawing with all the views laid out there for me at the same time.

If you are going to restrict yourself to B size due to printer limitations I'd think you'll need to stray away from Y14.1 & Y14.2 formatting to shrink the font size and title blocks etc.

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RE: Drafting Standard Sheet Sizes and Plot Size

Even with the sheet sized noted in my title block, people still have no concept that they're doing it wrong, despite the big borders or white space on only two sides. Some people can't even seem to figure out the B size option on the print settings and print out D size on an A. Then scan and email that. On low dpi settings for small file size. Bitter? Me? No....

You could go the aerospace tooling route and make everything 36x<variable> and end up with 36 x 144 and stuff like that... and someone will still print it on 8.5x11 and wonder how people are supposed to read it...

Personally, I make everything D size so that half-scale looks good on 11x17 still. That seems to be very popular.

Some places make /everything/ D-size, even if it's a barely-complicated flat washer 2'' in diameter. You end up with a washer blown up to like 8:1 scale and a bunch of dead white space. That's just their standard sheet.

Anyone making or designing parts should have a B size printer in the office. It's a safe assumption. I include sheet size in the title block - it's an insignificant function in almost any CAD software, and helps identify what it 'should be' to someone who actually wants to print it 'as intended'.

RE: Drafting Standard Sheet Sizes and Plot Size

Quote (KENAT)

...

If you are going to restrict yourself to B size due to printer limitations I'd think you'll need to stray away from Y14.1 & Y14.2 formatting to shrink the font size and title blocks etc.

That is exactly what I would do. I don't need a 6mm title or drawing number font on B size.

--
JHG

RE: Drafting Standard Sheet Sizes and Plot Size

We use C-size and E-size drawing formats per ASME Y14.1. When we print, we scale them down to a B-size printer. When we plot, we usually scale the E-size to C-size and plot the C-size full scale. Some of the electrical guys do D-size formats in a different CAD system and they plot them full scale.

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