INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Jobs

Anchor hole for 1/2" rod

Anchor hole for 1/2" rod

(OP)
AISC specifies the hold diameters for anchors, but starts at 3/4" with no apparent pattern I can easily detect. Maybe just a low morning - trying to determine appropriate hole size for 1/2" anchors to allow for fit up.

Anyone ever come across this?

You might be thinking...why 1/2" ? We have spacing requirements for anchoring a logo into a concrete parapet. Before everyone get's into a tizzy about the parapet (haha), the building isn't built yet - we are in design working with the building structural to mount this thing.

Normally I'd say just go with oversize holes in lieu of guidance, and since shear is necessary, field weld some washer plates once we are fit up, but perhaps someone has a "legitimate" hold diameter out there...?

RE: Anchor hole for 1/2" rod

Try specifying 7/8" diameter holes for 1/2" anchor rods.
Dave

Thaidavid

RE: Anchor hole for 1/2" rod

Well, you are going to insert a 1/2 diameter anchor rod into finished (hardened) concrete, but how are you holding the anchor rod into the hole?

If using a two-part epoxy (my recommendation), then epoxy tube will have specific drill diameters, drill depths, cleaning rules, and hold times before applying weight.
If using a expanding-type insert, then screwing into the threaded insert to expand it into the concrete, you need to know the maker and style to find the drill diameter.

Can't just insert the rod into a hole.

RE: Anchor hole for 1/2" rod

(OP)
Thanks Dave for the input.

Racookpe - I don't know whether I should be insulted haha (I'm not) or what, but it's a cast-in-place anchor rod. I was talking about the holes in the base plate itself. For fit up, due to variances in the field or whatever you want to call it, AISC allows for larger than "normal" bolt holes for the anchor rods. My apologies if that wasn't clear.

RE: Anchor hole for 1/2" rod

Why can't you use table J3.3? 9/16" standard hole or 5/8" oversized hole for 1/2" bolt. If you can control it, you can force field verification of anchor locations and then use standard holes, or you can provide oversized holes and weld a washer with a standard holes as required for shear transfer.

RE: Anchor hole for 1/2" rod

(OP)
Good insight, and I "can" do that, but I just want to know if anyone has a value for 1/2" anchors as if they appeared on the table. Thanks for the post.

RE: Anchor hole for 1/2" rod

From my drawing notes(may have to be formatted):


HOLES IN BASE PLATES, SIZE AND THICKNESS OF WASHER SHALL BE AS FOLLOWS

AB DIA BPL HOLE DIA MIN WASHER DIA MIN WASHER THICK
(IN) (IN) (IN) (IN)
1/2 1 1-3/4 3/16
5/8 1-1/8 1-3/4 1/4
3/4 1-5/16 2 1/4
7/8 1-9/16 2-1/2 5/16
1 1-13/16 3 3/8
1-1/4 2-1/16 3 1/2
1-1/2 2-5/16 3-1/2 1/2


The post has spaces between the numbers that don't show up.

Dik

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!


Resources


Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close