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Words are very interesting.

Words are very interesting.

(OP)

pennpiper (Mechanical)
(OP)
7 Nov 16 17:57
Throughout my career I have seen a few words (listed below) used to identify a person in the very early years of their career. These words are very different (spelling & pronunciation) but actually mean the much the same thing. They seem to be just minor cultural differences due to language-to-language translations.
In the early years of my career, I used some of these words (Beginner, Novice & Trainee) but others are relatively new to me.
I'm sure there are other examples of this in the engineering fields.

Word Examples:

Apprentice – noun
1. A person who works for another in order to learn a trade: an apprentice to a plumber.
2. A learner; novice; tyro.

Beginner - noun
1. A person or thing that begins.
2. A person who has begun a course of instruction or is learning the fundamentals
3. A person who is inexperienced; novice.

Dither - noun (By JAE)
1. "Deer In The Headlights Expressive Reaction"
2. A trembling; vibration.
2. A state of flustered excitement or fear.

Entry-Level – adjective
1. Of or relating to, or filling a low-level job in which an employee may gain experience or skills:

Fresher – noun, British Slang.
1. A Freshman.

Grunt - Slang (BigInch)
1. A common or unskilled worker; laborer.

Intern - noun (JAE)
1. A person who works as an apprentice or trainee in an occupation or profession to gain practical experience

Newbie (Noobs) – noun
1. A newcomer or novice, especially an inexperienced user of the Internet or of computers in general.

Novice – noun
1. A person who is new to the circumstances, work, etc., in which he or she is placed; beginner.

Rookie - noun (JAE)
1. A raw recruit, a novice; tyro.

Trainee – noun
1. A person being trained, especially in a vocation; apprentice.

Tyro - noun, (plural tyros)
1. A beginner in learning anything; novice, example, a novice in politics.


Anyone out there have any suggestions to add to this word category or have other category examples offer?


Sometimes its possible to do all the right things and still get bad results

Sometimes its possible to do all the right things and still get bad results

RE: Words are very interesting.

manager
1) someone who doesn't know their limitations
2) someone who, despite indications to the contrary, believes they're right
3) a derogatory appellation directed by engineers to supervising non-engineers (who usually fit either, or both, of the previous meanings).

another day in paradise, or is paradise one day closer ?

RE: Words are very interesting.

Green or greenhorn

RE: Words are very interesting.

And possibly (as translated from Spanish): immature, neophyte, inexperienced, amateur, starter, learner

RE: Words are very interesting.

Speaking of interesting words or at least who uses certain words and why, here's an item that covers the topic from a point of view I've not thought much about before. That being said, my wife and I having been having an interesting experience these last 6 month or so. In late May we drove to Katy, Texas (25 miles West of Houston) to attend our oldest granddaughter's high school graduation. Before we left for home we invited her to come back with us to spend the summer as we knew she wasn't getting along with her mother, our daughter-in-law. Anyway, to make a long story short(er) she decided to stay and has since gotten a good full-time job and has really settled in (we said she could stay with us for up to three years because that's when her sister graduates from school so who knows, we may have to provide her the same opportunity).

Anyway, to the point, after reading the article below I can see what he means about there being a generational difference in our vocabularies and while our granddaughter is very well spoken and articulate, which was critical with respect to the job that she got, and she's very well read and continues to read a lot, her everyday working vocabulary is very different than ours. Now it could partially be geographical as my wife and I were born and raised in Northern Michigan and lived there until we 'immigrated' to SoCal in 1980 while Tyler, our granddaughter, has lived in Texas since she was a just over a year old. But as the article points out, there have been shifts in how our generation (schooled in the 50's and 60's) use their vocabulary verse today's school age kids.

How Our Vocabulary Gives Away Our Age

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/delfan-carbonell/voc...

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: Words are very interesting.

@JohnRBaker

Interesting article - I know recently we had a conference room full of young engineers stare at us blankly when a senior engineer referenced the recurring meeting as 'same Bat-time, same Bat-channel'

Catch phrases like "where's the beef?", "well excuuuuuuuse me"? Forget about it.

I imagine it is even more confusing when you introduce in people from other cultures

RE: Words are very interesting.

"I imagine it is even more confusing when you introduce in people from other cultures " especially if you bring the Aussie's on board and really want to get confused.

It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts. (Sherlock Holmes - A Scandal in Bohemia.)

RE: Words are very interesting.

I can remember when idioms were a problem for people from other countries but at the moment, they seem to be a problem for the latest generation of Americans as well.

As for the Aussie comment, I never really had that much of a problem when visiting OZ, and I've made the trip at least 17 or 18 times over the course of 25 years, no it was the UK where I had the most problems with the local vocabulary and idioms. Back in the late-80's we acquired a British company located in Cambridge and I ended-up making several trips there over the next few years. It wasn't so much that the Brits used words unfamiliar with us colonists, just that they used words that had totally different meanings than how we used them, and at times, the confusion could be very embarrassing, such as the misunderstood meaning of words like 'fanny', 'napkin' and 'homely'. And it went both ways. I can recall the laugh that one of our new English co-workers got when he saw a building with a 'Drug Store' sign on it. Apparently the word 'drug' has only one meaning in the UK and it's not a good one.

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: Words are very interesting.

You need to read the book Decline of the English Murder, by George Orwell. Apparently, many, many English expressions from the Tyndall bible, from Shakespeare and from Rudyard Kipling. People don't know this, and many of the expressions are used way out of context. Now, Monty Pythonisms are creeping in. What is a twenty something to make of the term "pining for the fiords"?

--
JHG

RE: Words are very interesting.

John: I think the Aussie's were being kind to you.

It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts. (Sherlock Holmes - A Scandal in Bohemia.)

RE: Words are very interesting.

My brother used to work out where to rig the explosives for underground mining had a blasting cap detonated in his hands when a co-worker misunderstood a request to check the line and applied power to check for continuity. So yes, words are very interesting.

My brother was okay - hands and chest scarred up but his face was okay as he was turning to talk to the guy that almost killed him

RE: Words are very interesting.

I worked for a British company years ago and we would have English visitors all the time here in South Carolina. One young English engineer nearly fell of his bar stool when a local girl asked him if he wanted to shag (a local dance). It has a very different meaning in England.

I agree with Artisi that the Aussie's were being kind to JohnRBaker, I have heard some of them utter the most incomprehensible slang for someone supposedly speaking English.

----------------------------------------

The Help for this program was created in Windows Help format, which depends on a feature that isn't included in this version of Windows.

RE: Words are very interesting.

what happened to protégée? It seems like folks now like, "Mentee!"

f-d

ípapß gordo ainÆt no madre flaca!

RE: Words are very interesting.

Mentee is hideous.

----------------------------------------

The Help for this program was created in Windows Help format, which depends on a feature that isn't included in this version of Windows.

RE: Words are very interesting.

A word often used to describe a raw student or trainee , Ab initio .
B.E.

You are judged not by what you know, but by what you can do.

RE: Words are very interesting.

"often" might be a stretch except among Latin speakers.

----------------------------------------

The Help for this program was created in Windows Help format, which depends on a feature that isn't included in this version of Windows.

RE: Words are very interesting.

Tenderfoot
Fledgling
Greenhorn

All of which I fear also pertain to John's article premise...

My 91 year old Italian mother used to use "abecedarian" on us when we entered Kindergarten (I don't remember it for me, but I witnessed it for my little sister), meaning someone just learning their letters. "Oh this is my daughter Julie, she is our little abecedarian." Mom grew up in pre-war Italy where she was taught Latin in school, and when you first started, you were considered "in abecedarius", meaning learning the first letters of the alphabet; a, be, ce, de. I remember hearing it and just kind of accepted it as another of those $10 words that parents used. It wasn't until I was in college that I discovered nobody else had EVER heard it.

In the 50s and 60s when this took place, she was looked down upon by the anglo neighbors for being an "olive skinned foreigner" (see, things are not really so different as we think they are.) So having been a philosophy student prior to and during (as much as possible) the war before coming here with my American soldier father, she liked to rub her intellect in their faces whenever she felt marginalized by them. Almost all of her friends for most of her life ended up being other "war brides" whom she met in her citizenship classes, from places all over the world; Poland, Spain, the Philippines, Venezuela, Japan, Hawaii, all of them treated poorly by the home girls when they got here.




"You measure the size of the accomplishment by the obstacles you had to overcome to reach your goals" -- Booker T. Washington

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