INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Jobs

Temper Embrittlement (?) of 410 & 410S stainless steel

Temper Embrittlement (?) of 410 & 410S stainless steel

(OP)
Looking for the susceptibility of these steels to temper embrittlement, particularly 410S. In principle it is possible, but I've been unable to locate hard data.

"If you don't have time to do the job right the first time, when are you going to find time to repair it?"

RE: Temper Embrittlement (?) of 410 & 410S stainless steel

(OP)
(Sorry, wrong category)

"If you don't have time to do the job right the first time, when are you going to find time to repair it?"

RE: Temper Embrittlement (?) of 410 & 410S stainless steel

But in case you are wondering, 410S has so little carbon that it wont form marteniste even with a hard quench, it is a ferritic alloy.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
P.E. Metallurgy, Plymouth Tube

RE: Temper Embrittlement (?) of 410 & 410S stainless steel

(OP)
EdS,
I know 410S is ferritic, does that preclude the possibility of TE?

"If you don't have time to do the job right the first time, when are you going to find time to repair it?"

RE: Temper Embrittlement (?) of 410 & 410S stainless steel

Yes, see below
The alloy can not be hardened by heat treatment. It is annealed in the 1600 –
1650°F (871 – 899°C) range and then air cooled to relieve cold working
stresses. 410S should not be exposed to temperatures of 2000°F (1093°C) or
above due to embrittlement. If excessive large grains are encountered after
annealing mildly cold-worked material, the annealing temperature should be
decreased to a range of 1200 – 1350°F (649 – 732°C) range


http://www.aksteel.com/pdf/markets_products/stainl...

RE: Temper Embrittlement (?) of 410 & 410S stainless steel

(OP)
Thanks all, and not a minute too soon.

"If you don't have time to do the job right the first time, when are you going to find time to repair it?"

RE: Temper Embrittlement (?) of 410 & 410S stainless steel

Though as a ferritic if you hold it at temps in the range of 600-1100F you will get secondary phase embrittlement (885F is the peak temp). This is much less severe in 410S than in higher Cr ferritics and is not a fatal issue usually.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
P.E. Metallurgy, Plymouth Tube

RE: Temper Embrittlement (?) of 410 & 410S stainless steel

(OP)
I considered 885°F embrittlement as well. The light gauge welded parts will be cooled fairly quickly through this range, which is also well above service temperature.

"If you don't have time to do the job right the first time, when are you going to find time to repair it?"

RE: Temper Embrittlement (?) of 410 & 410S stainless steel

Just to add to my comment above, I don't like seeing these welded with low Ni austenitics. It is too easy to get a very bad duplex structure in the weld and even less ductility than the ferritic (which is saying something). I have seen such welds have DBTs that are above room temp.......

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
P.E. Metallurgy, Plymouth Tube

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!


Resources


Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close