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Difference Between Motor and Motoreductor

Difference Between Motor and Motoreductor

(OP)
Hello there!

I'm on a project to develop a rolling table with chains and gears. But the application needs more speed than torque. That's because the load that it will carry is not so heavy, but the speed that we need it to be transport is importat.

My question is, can I use a motor with an inversor, so that I can reduce the speed of the motor so that it have a high torque with reasonable speed? Will it be harmful to my motor? What is the limit to reduce the speed of it?

And if I do it, and it work, what's the usage of a motoreductor?

This question may be different, but is a question that I've being asking since I'm on this project.

Best regards.

Gustavo

RE: Difference Between Motor and Motoreductor

Hi Gustavo
The torque of a motor is directly inverse to speed, so if the motor speed increases the torque will decrease, or do you mean using a constant torque motor driven by an inverter?

“Do not worry about your problems with mathematics, I assure you mine are far greater.” Albert Einstein

RE: Difference Between Motor and Motoreductor

(OP)
Yeah, that's what I want. To reduce the speed, so that it will not turn with 1800 rpm.
At the end the speed will maintain constant, and so the torque.

My question if I can do it with the motor, why using a motoreductor.

RE: Difference Between Motor and Motoreductor

Hi Gustavo

In your original post you stated you want to increase speed but in your last one you say reduce it so I'm confused.
What you need to do is start with the torque you need to move the object in question and over come the inertia of the rollers and chains, from that and knowing the speed you want the table to move you can size the motor you require.
If you want to then control the speed and keep the torque constant you can do that with an inverter.
I'm sorry I don't know what you mean by motoreductor unless you mean induction motor.

“Do not worry about your problems with mathematics, I assure you mine are far greater.” Albert Einstein

RE: Difference Between Motor and Motoreductor

(OP)
Let me explain it letter. And sorry for the motoredctor, I wanted to say gearmotor.

I want to know why I need to use a gearmotor, if with a motor and an inverter I can get the same result.
Using the inverter and a motor, I can reduce the speed to increase my torque. The same way that with a gearmotor I have a speed reduced to increase the torque.
Is that because the gears at the gearmotor increase the resistence of my structure?

Sorry for my english. I'm still learning it.

RE: Difference Between Motor and Motoreductor

A gearbox will reduce speed and increase torque capacity. A VFD (variable frequency drive, or inverter) will reduce speed but it cannot increase torque capacity of a motor.

RE: Difference Between Motor and Motoreductor

Hi Gustavo

You can control the torque at any speed with an inverter but you cannot exceed the designed torque for the said motor.
see this link

http://www.pacontrol.com/download/Adjustable-Speed...

“Do not worry about your problems with mathematics, I assure you mine are far greater.” Albert Einstein

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