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Force required to fit bearing

Force required to fit bearing

(OP)
I know that asking for an accurate formula for the force required to fit a bearing onto a shaft (or a shaft into a bearing) is like asking for a three-word solution to Fermat's Last Theorem, so I am not going to ask for one. thumbsup2 However, if there is someone practiced in such Black Arts who can seriously suggest a Ball-park figure for the Force (in Newtons) required to press a 32 mm single-race ball bearing onto a shaft, I would be really appreciative. bow

Thanks

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Artificial Intelligence is no match for Natural Stupidity

RE: Force required to fit bearing

2
Hi vagulus,

You have provided precious little info to start.

Do you know what the shaft diameter is within 0.0002 inch or so?
Note "is" is not the same as what appears on the shaft drawing.
And how round the shaft is, especially if it is a centerless ground part.

What do you know about the design of the machine?
IF the shaft is stationary a slight amount of clearance and a slip fit MAY be just fine.
If the shaft rotates, like the rotor of an electric motor, some amount of interference is likely required.
Depending on the application the bearing may require greater than standard internal clearance lest it become too tight when the inner race is expanded by the tight fitting shaft ( or outer race by the housing) or if the shaft runs hot, like an electric motor.
There needs to be another bearing on the shaft somewhere. How is thermal growth accomadated?

For typical applications a light drive fit, or maybe a few hundred pounds of force would suffice.
As would heating the bearing on a 100W incandescent light bulb for 15 minutes or so.
http://model-a-ford.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11...

pages 13 to 14 here -
http://www.skf.com/binary/tcm:12-114679/140-710%20...

RE: Force required to fit bearing

(OP)
Thanks for that. (That Skefco Manual will come in handy thanks)

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Artificial Intelligence is no match for Natural Stupidity

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