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3d printed parts in a real car

3d printed parts in a real car

(OP)
Okay this stuff is pretty mind blowing.

I've heard of 3d printing but had no clue that they are this level now.

Apparently, the Aston Martin in Skyfall (James Bond) movie was 3d printed (Fully driveable).

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2232252/The-secret-James-Bonds-priceless-Aston-Martin-DB-5-stunts-3D-printed-models-used-Skyfalls-dangerous-scenes.html

The reason it was 3d printed was becasue they had to blow it up in one of the scenes (Fair enough).

Has anyone tried using this technology on a consumer level?

Here you can even find digital files (Fuel door holder) that simply require an upload on a proper 3d printer.


https://pinshape.com/items/13989-3d-printed-chevrolet-aveo-fuel-door-holder-replacement


Love to know about your experiences with this tech - if any?

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

"Apparently, the Aston Martin in Skyfall (James Bond) movie was 3d printed (Fully driveable)."

No, not 'fully driveable'.

One-third scale for blowing-up purposes. Says so in the linked article.

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

2
Yup, I am consistently amused by the fanboy boosterism of a manufacturing technique that sacrifices such a huge part of the material's stiffness,strength,and fatigue properties. It has a place, for toys and tooling, but for production in the real world for cars it will rarely be appropriate other than for cosmetic purposes.

Cheers

Greg Locock


New here? Try reading these, they might help FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies http://eng-tips.com/market.cfm?

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

...Not to mention speed of mass production.

--

These days everything is overhyped. 'Everything' will be 3D Printed 'within five years.' Self Driving Cars are here 'now', <crash> oops... "Autonomous" dancing drones, controlled by computers in the back room. Lockheed supposedly has Fusion reactors on the back of trucks. BAE will be growing airplanes in vats.

Sigh... winky smile

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

I love when they say people are going to make their own clothes with these things. When everyone wants the absolutely cheapest product possible, do they have any idea what the cost of the raw materials are for 3D printers? Not to mention all the practical problems of actually wearing or washing something from a 3D printer. Hype Hype Hype

Even the cosmetics straight off the printer are not good. Usually have to to a lot of hand finishing and painting to make something presentable.

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The Help for this program was created in Windows Help format, which depends on a feature that isn't included in this version of Windows.

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

Well, Airbus is betting quite heavily on 3D printing with their APWorks subsidiary. They are already using over 1000 printed parts in a plane and I saw an article 6 months ago about them 3D printing structural partition frameworks to support the structure/walls around the gallery so their use of 3D printing is going beyond just cosmetics.

But the speed tends to be slow and the costs somewhat high. So, maybe for today you can say " for production in the real world for cars it will rarely be appropriate other than for cosmetic purposes". But, you certainly can't say this will always be true and it certainly won't be only cosmetic purposes. There is the ability to make same strength but significantly lighter weight structural pieces and car manufacturers certainly want lighter weight these days.

There is a lot of R&D with improvements in processes and materials constantly happening. The abilities of production machines are changing very rapidly. We won't soon see a world where everything is 3D printed, but the technology has moved well past being only good for prototyping certain parts.

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

(OP)
Thanks for the responses guys. I think like any technology, let's give this one some time to mature. I would say 20 years before this becomes a household name or what not. Sure looks promising though. At one point a car or 'horseless carriage' as it was first known was considered hype too. One this for sure, I'll be researching this over the weekend :) Cheers!

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

I think I made my first rapid prototype nearly 30 years ago. Sure, it's improving but it's a niche technology.

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The Help for this program was created in Windows Help format, which depends on a feature that isn't included in this version of Windows.

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

The current media hype surrounding 3D printing and additive manufacturing processes is mostly nonsense. The processes are still far too slow and costly for production use except for a very few applications.

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

Perhaps we should specify that by 3d printing we mean additive manufacture of parts from bulk material. The material spec for scalmalloy is pretty good although the ductility is too low for my purposes.

Cheers

Greg Locock


New here? Try reading these, they might help FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies http://eng-tips.com/market.cfm?

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

I highly doubt that mass manufacturing techniques will ever be replaced by additive type processes, even at a fraction of its volume. Time is money, and it's getting more expensive every day. Not unless someone invents a Star-Trek type replicator that can deliver in seconds, in which case I will celebrate with a perfectly done 24 oz. Porterhouse with butter and horseradish, and a nice Malt Star to wash it down. Until it can handle that order, it's still good for prototypes and the occasional tradeshow model.

It is better to have enough ideas for some of them to be wrong, than to be always right by having no ideas at all.

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

"I highly doubt that mass manufacturing techniques will ever be replaced by additive type processes..."

Many people will disagree with you. They believe that 'someday soon, everything will be 3D Printed...'

They're naive and completely wrong of course.

We can put some of the blame on misleadingly-overhyped headlines that include lies such as '3D Printed Car'. Too many don't realize what's feasible and what's pure hype.

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

Anybody who thinks this will be a feasible way to build a car has never worked in an iron foundry.

Once again, I think a 2 year stint as a grunt in an iron foundry should be compulsory for all able bodied males between 18 and 45.

"Formal education is a weapon, whose effect depends on who holds it in his hands and at whom it is aimed." ~ Joseph Stalin

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

As an Explorer Scout sponsored by United States Steel in Pittsburgh, we toured just about every steel mill in the area (at that time there were a lot of mills). The one thing I learned was that I NEVER want to work in a steel mill. We also toured Gulf Oil's research center, that was the highlight of the year. GT40 race cars! Dynomometers!

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The Help for this program was created in Windows Help format, which depends on a feature that isn't included in this version of Windows.

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

Running an internal combustion engine on a Dynamometer is a spectacle which illustrates human kind's greatest achievements ever.

"Formal education is a weapon, whose effect depends on who holds it in his hands and at whom it is aimed." ~ Joseph Stalin

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

I hear they're going to 3d print engine dynamometers from now on :p

"Formal education is a weapon, whose effect depends on who holds it in his hands and at whom it is aimed." ~ Joseph Stalin

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

For parts that see little stress, of that can be seriously over designed AM will work. Things such as fuel nozzles in gas turbines are an example. They can make single piece parts with details that are impossible even in todays 20 piece assemblies.
But today even the best process with Ni or Ti alloys have serious issues. They cannot tell you before they make a part what the grain structure and properties will be, and worse the properties vary by direction. Fatigue properties are barely as good as modern castings, even with HIP (expensive) treatment.
And NDT is expensive (full CT?).
They have a place. If you need to make a lightly loaded, intricate part, from an expensive material then give AM a look. Or if you need to make a highly customized part (prosthetic) as a one-off it also has real advantages.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
P.E. Metallurgy, Plymouth Tube

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

My 3D printer part broke because it was brittle - not ductile.

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

Guys, don't sell the technology short. Being "overhyped" is a state of perception, not a property of the tech. It has some unique capabilities that appear to be very useful.

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

"Being 'overhyped' is a state of perception..."

I disagree with that.

'Overhyped' relates to an output, the transmitter end. Marketing. BS Press Releases. Headlines that lie. Airhead tech journalists parroting nonsense.

A better word to describe the 'state of perception' at the receiver end is 'Naïve'.

Everyone should agree with you that the technology is what it actually is, and obviously can be extremely useful.

Just not for 3D Printing 'fully driveable' Aston Martins. Not now. Not in the foreseeable future. Probably not ever.

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

"Probably not ever."

Never say never. Sure "the technology is what it actually is", but tomorrow it will be something different.

je suis charlie

RE: 3d printed parts in a real car

Being very generous, I did write "Probably...".

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