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What are the best options to make a Rout Tool (resins and cloth types)

What are the best options to make a Rout Tool (resins and cloth types)

(OP)
Hello, I will try to make a rout tool to trim some parts from production that are scribe line trimmed at the moment, I have a little knowledge about making tools. But not so sure what would be the best option for Resins and Cloth type to use for a rout tool, does any person on the forum can provide support on this topic.

Thanks a lot for your support and experience.

RE: What are the best options to make a Rout Tool (resins and cloth types)

Most routing tools are made from rag based phenolic resin , either canvas base or linen base. these are less abrasive to the tool than fiberglass based plastics. there are several different manufacturers, see link below. don't forget to put your tool offsets in.
B.E.

You are judged not by what you know, but by what you can do.

RE: What are the best options to make a Rout Tool (resins and cloth types)

(OP)
Thank you very much Berkshire, the problem I see on the Canvas is that it seems to be for flat areas but this one has several radious areas, or it can achieved any radious or shape we need?

Thanks a lot!

RE: What are the best options to make a Rout Tool (resins and cloth types)

Ok,
The materials I mentioned are used most for tools made from prefabricated sheet . To make a molded trim tool epoxy resin is a better choice than phenolic because of the lower shrinkage rates. Glass fiber is most often used for the layup for ease of fabrication. The next step is determined by how many parts you want to trim with this tool. A cheap tool will have no reinforcing on the edge and is only expected to last for a few parts. more sophisticated tools will have a wear resistant insert incorporated into the edge of the part such as steel rule die material or other metal insert . I strongly suspect that based on what you have said the part will be trimmed with a hand router. The tools I thought you wanted in your first post are used with a pin router or vertical spindle table router.
B.E.

You are judged not by what you know, but by what you can do.

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