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Wet Riveting in Aircraft Industry

Wet Riveting in Aircraft Industry

(OP)
thread2-259226: Wet Rivet Shear Strength

Currently I am working as a Process Engineer and I’m responsible for supervising the sealing process of wings (specially fuel tanks) and fuselage panels. Now I’m interest in understanding the history of sealing process and the introduction of sealants in aircraft industry. I’ve read some interest posts in this forum. Do you know where can I find information about this matter?

RE: Wet Riveting in Aircraft Industry

wait for Will Taylor to respond. this has been discussed several times, you may find using "search".

another day in paradise, or is paradise one day closer ?

RE: Wet Riveting in Aircraft Industry

Rule one for "wet" riveting; The job is not complete until you have the sealer all over you . evil
B.E.

You are judged not by what you know, but by what you can do.

RE: Wet Riveting in Aircraft Industry

(OP)
I'm preparing a presentation for a conference and what I'm looking for is to have some historical background based on references in literature or credible sites.. That's why I need your help! :D

RE: Wet Riveting in Aircraft Industry

will (taylor) will have it all ! much of it is already in previous threads.

another day in paradise, or is paradise one day closer ?

RE: Wet Riveting in Aircraft Industry

Will Taylor in one of his other posts hit on a bugaboo of mine about fabricating wet fuel tanks with sealer coated rivets. When driving rivets with an air hammer or squeeze riveter, you have to absolutely make sure the rivet is fully bedded in the countersink, or down flush on the surface. The impacts of the air hammer do not move the sealant which forms a viscous lock kinda like silly putty that moves OK until you try to move it fast. The result is that after the rivet is set the sealant slowly moves out of the way reducing the clamp up of the rivets, we used to wait ten minutes then re-shoot or re-squeeze the rivets.
I would guess the nearest analogy is like re- clamping a glued joint to restore the clamping pressure after the glue has squeezed out a little.
B.E.


You are judged not by what you know, but by what you can do.

RE: Wet Riveting in Aircraft Industry

Guys... too much pressure@#$%*&!

Am very busy today... will submit a 'Reader's Digest' reply early next week.

Regards, Wil Taylor

o Trust - But Verify!
o We believe to be true what we prefer to be true. [Unknown]
o For those who believe, no proof is required; for those who cannot believe, no proof is possible. [variation,Stuart Chase]
o Unfortunately, in science what You 'believe' is irrelevant. ["Orion"]
o Learn the rules like a pro, so you can b

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