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Civil Engineering terminology

Civil Engineering terminology

Civil Engineering terminology

(OP)
Good Afternoon,

Maybe a slightly unusual question!!

Imaging a sloping storm tank floor (sometimes called the bottom plate) which is sloping in a downward direction at a 4 degree slope. This is to encourage sediment transport towards the sump.

at the end of this 4% sloped floor is a deeper sump where we have pumps installed.

Now, the height of the lowest point of the corner before it drops into the sump, I am not certain what this 'point' is referred to in civil / hydraulic engineering terms.

I don't think 'lip' is correct, neither is it an apex or crest.

Could anybody help me with this? It will save me hours of googling!!

Regards
John

RE: Civil Engineering terminology

Yep, it's some sort of "invert".

RE: Civil Engineering terminology

I'd call it the "break point", or the "top of sump".

RE: Civil Engineering terminology

The only word I can find with this meaning is "nadir", but I never seen it used in this context.

RE: Civil Engineering terminology

Sump inlet elevation.

Thaidavid

RE: Civil Engineering terminology

I would suggest "thingamajig" but that would be to be a bit humourous . . . But, how about "sump obvert"?

RE: Civil Engineering terminology

"floor invert at top of sump"

RE: Civil Engineering terminology

is there a reason you want to name it? just call it elevation "A"

RE: Civil Engineering terminology

(OP)
I have called it the sloping floor/ sump interface level.

Thanks for your comments.

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