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Beam column connection in glulam members

Beam column connection in glulam members

(OP)
Beam to column glulaminated member connection
Now the dilemma I am facing is should I make the beam interrupt the column or should I make column interrupt the beam? I have attached pics to make it clear
If I make the beams interrupt the columns then doesn't that mean the beam will carry the axial loads that are coming from the above column if so is there a need for any design adjustments? See Fig A)
Or if I make the columns interrupt the beams then should I assume the beams to be a series of one span fixed support beam without continuity meaning should I assume there is no transfer of moments from one span to the other span? See Fig B)

RE: Beam column connection in glulam members

Detail A or similar: Check bearing capacity perpendicular to grain in the beam (with axial force coming from the column above). There could be problems with shrinking, combined with large axial loads (vertical deformation in the beam).
Detail B or similar: I prefer this arrangement. With special detail you could transfer moments but usually this is not the case.

Do you need moment fixity for lateral stability of the structure?

RE: Beam column connection in glulam members

(OP)
yeah because I have done the analysis part with a common Etabs software which assumes moment transfer between spans (continuity ).

RE: Beam column connection in glulam members

I also prefer detail B for the reasons that molybdenum listed. All that drilled in rebar looks like a hassle too. Keep in mid that there are practical limitations on the length of individual timber members that can be ordered as well.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Beam column connection in glulam members

Another important consideration is that most glulams have different strengths in their outermost laminations. In other words, there is a "tension side" and "compression side"....or top and bottom of the glulam. If your glulam is continuous over the column, you will need to make sure that each lamination can handle the stresses from the positive and negative moments.

RE: Beam column connection in glulam members

Resize your beams based on simple span and have the columns interrupt the beams. Moment connections in wood are a disaster waiting to happen in my eyes.

RE: Beam column connection in glulam members

(OP)
Can I make beam to column connection simply supported? I mean will it have enough resistance as a frame ? I am designing a G+1 residential building.
I have attached the connection I am planning to use in my design & the question I am struggling with is; will it carry & transfer moment in other words do I need to design the bolts for flexure ? I have only designed the bolts in plate A with the shear force from the beam reaction I have gotten in my analysis, & how will I design plate B & plate c.
& I thank you all for your comments.

RE: Beam column connection in glulam members

Quote (OP)

Can I make beam to column connection simply supported? I mean will it have enough resistance as a frame ?

Once you make the beams simply supported, they will not be able to be used as part of a moment frame lateral system. You would need to use something else for your lateral system.

Quote (OP)

will it carry & transfer moment in other words do I need to design the bolts for flexure ?

I see the bolts in plate B being designed for shear and tension and the bolts in plate A being designed for a small amount of shear if the beams will have axial forces in them.

I'd recommend posting a sketch of the joint showing the forces that you intend to design for. We'll be in a better position to help that way.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Beam column connection in glulam members

(OP)
okay kootk if it helps to make it more clear I am only dealing with shear & bending moment, I have sketched the shear force & bending moment diagrams of the frame... look it over. The analysis of this diagrams is based on the assumption of making the connection rigid that is only an assumption please comment here as well.

RE: Beam column connection in glulam members

Thanks, got it. Two comments:

1) It appears that you've disregarded the advice above to make this a simple connection that a frame connection.

2) As detailed, your connection will not be suitable for transferring moment.

Do you have to resist lateral loads using your timber frame as a moment frame?

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Beam column connection in glulam members

(OP)
what else can I use to provide a lateral support for this type of building? meaning won't any lateral bracing disturb the architectural aspect of a residential building? plus I have got this comment from someone that making all of my supports simple or pin will make my frame truss & that means I will be needing diagonal supports this will be far complicated to imagine... what do you all think?

RE: Beam column connection in glulam members

Quote (OP)

what else can I use to provide a lateral support for this type of building?

Shear walls? Braced frames? It depends what your constraints are.

Quote (OP)

plus I have got this comment from someone that making all of my supports simple or pin will make my frame truss & that means I will be needing diagonal supports this will be far complicated to imagine

I'm not sure what mean here. Most timber beams are simply supported.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Beam column connection in glulam members

(OP)
Thank you KootK, you have been a great help.

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