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Actuator for a wrist tremor suppression sleeve/exoskelet

Actuator for a wrist tremor suppression sleeve/exoskelet

(OP)
Hey everyone,

We are currently working on a project to make a kind of sleeve that can suppress a big part of the wrist tremor that Parkinson patients or people with other diseases have. We are trying to decide to make this a partially active system, with only adjustable damping, or a fully active system with actuators that uses forces to counteract the tremor (out-of-phase). The problem is that we don't find any actuators that would be able to do this. It has to be very light and small, so that it could fit in just a normal long sleeve. And it would have to be able to deliver the needed forces.

We were looking at Electroactive Polymers, because these are sometimes used as artificial muscles, but it seems these wouldn't be able to deliver the necessary forces. We were wondering if anybody here knew about a kind of actuator that would be an option in this project? Or maybe a kind of electroactive polymer that could work?

Thanks to everybody who wants to help us realizing this product that could help many people around the world!

RE: Actuator for a wrist tremor suppression sleeve/exoskelet

Texas Instruments once tried to commercialize standard wax motors built in Massachusetts, but I think the market is now dominated by full custom designs by other outfits.
... and they may not be fast enough to dynamically suppress tremors.
... but they are capable of substantial force in a small envelope.
... if you neglect the electrical power supply.
... but 'wax motors' might be worth learning about.


Mike Halloran
Pembroke Pines, FL, USA

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