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Anodize / Electrostatic Dissipative coating

Anodize / Electrostatic Dissipative coating

(OP)
Hi Everyone

Need some advice of this as i'm not really familiar about anodizing or ESD coating!

I need an aluminium plate to be coated thru either anodize process or ESD coating to get my aluminium plate electrostatic resistant.
The resistant require in between 10 power of 5 to 10 power of 8 ohm.

The aluminium plate is use to soak in liquid at temperature of 140 degree celcius.
Dimension of aluminium plate at 350(L) x 150(W) x 10(H)

SO after the anodize or ESD process is done, will there be any standard of quality i could get it ratify that it could withstand electrostatic resistant between the mentioned ohm without performing ESD testing on all plate after the process, e.g like if i use certain process or certain checmical and it will definitely able to be in that range of resistant?

RE: Anodize / Electrostatic Dissipative coating

Anodizing converts some of the aluminum to aluminum oxide, an insulator.
The anodized surface should therefore be able to hold a charge, and may not be effective as an ESD surface.

How about chrome plating?

Mike Halloran
Pembroke Pines, FL, USA

RE: Anodize / Electrostatic Dissipative coating

(OP)
Chrome plate could turn it into electrostatic resistant? would it be in the standard of resistant without performing any test?

RE: Anodize / Electrostatic Dissipative coating

Chrome plate would make it reliably conductive, which would conduct any electrostatic charge to ground, if the plate is grounded.
I.e., it would be conductive.

If you want the sheet to be a really good insulator, anodize is not a good solution either, because it's microcracked.

With the chrome plate, or with bare aluminum, you could stick on several layers of insulating plastic. The selection of plastic is important, because many plastic films have pinholes, and many are porous.

At 140 degC, you are getting out of the range where thermoplastics are practical.
Teflon is normally the obvious solution for high temperature, but it's porous.

This is starting to smell like you're wanting to homebrew a cheap solution to a problem that someone else has already solved, because they're asking for what you regard as a lot of money for the solution.

So, let's back up a bit:

What is the liquid, and why is the conductivity of the insulator important, and since it's presumably isolated from the liquid, why is the metal necessary (instead of solid plastic), and why aluminum and not steel or brass or titanium?



Mike Halloran
Pembroke Pines, FL, USA

RE: Anodize / Electrostatic Dissipative coating

"The aluminium plate is use to soak in liquid at temperature of 140 degree celcius. " confused as to where Electro Static Discharge comes in on something in a liquid but OK.

We routinely make chucks for handling ESD sensitive components (disc drive components & the like) that are electroless nickel plated.

Posting guidelines FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies http://eng-tips.com/market.cfm? (probably not aimed specifically at you)
What is Engineering anyway: FAQ1088-1484: In layman terms, what is "engineering"?

RE: Anodize / Electrostatic Dissipative coating

(OP)
That plate was for testing of sensitive electronic component. We looking for coating like ESD(Electrostatic Dissipative) coating as the solution.
But if there any better suggestion, willing to listen to!

RE: Anodize / Electrostatic Dissipative coating

In my limited experience for ESD they typically require a some minimum level of conductivity (i.e. some maximum level of resistance to ground).

A highly conductive surface/part etc. is generally OK.

However, in your world/application this may not be the case.

Posting guidelines FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies http://eng-tips.com/market.cfm? (probably not aimed specifically at you)
What is Engineering anyway: FAQ1088-1484: In layman terms, what is "engineering"?

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