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rain damage on wet concrete

rain damage on wet concrete

(OP)
We had our driveway replaced and shortly after the finishing heavy rain came down. the finish was brushed with a smooth border. We suggested to the contractor that he cover the driveway with a plastic tarp but said the concrete was cured and there would not be a problem. Well there is. The smooth border is potched and you can scrape sand particles with your hand. Is there a durability issue and what are my options. We want the driveway redone. Is that a viable option?

RE: rain damage on wet concrete

If the concrete had achieved enough strength to weather the storm the surface would not have loose sand particles. It is possible that there was enough water on the surface to change the water to cement ratio at the very top of the slab making it weak at the surface. If this were the case, just below the surface should have reached its full strength potential. In essence the slab might be structurally sound while the aesthetics of the surface are unacceptable. If the contractor offers to treat the surface in some manner to improve the aesthetics you may be spared the hassle of tearing it out. Any treatment would most likely involve first sandblasting or otherwise scarifying the surface to prepare the slab for additional treatments.

Larry from Lehigh White Cement Comapny

RE: rain damage on wet concrete

LehighLarry is correct, Though the surface may be unsightly the structural integrity of the slab is unhurt. Down side is you did not receive what you paid for and any corrective action may not give long turn satisfactory results. I would suggest a diamond polish machine to smooth out the surface; however this could prove to be a very expensive process. Chemical solutions such as adhesives rarely last long when used in outdoor applications.

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