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Effective Tensile Area of Thread

Effective Tensile Area of Thread

(OP)
thread177-33175: Calculation of Tensile Stress Area for Fasteners?

The referenced thread was an excellent discussion on the formulas regarding effective tensile area of a screw. In the 29th edition of the Machinery's Handbook, the selection of the two equations to compute At was changed from 100ksi to 180ksi. Does anyone have any background on that change? Typo?

RE: Effective Tensile Area of Thread

From John Bickford's An Introduction to the Design and Behavior of Bolted Joints, Third Edition: ANSI B1.1-1974 gave the cutoff point as 180,000 psi, while Machinery's Handbook 20th Edition used 100,000 psi. ANSI B1.1 removed this tensile stress area equation from the 1984 and 1989 editions.

A reference he provided is:

Srinivas, A.R., Determination of Torque Values for Metric Fasteners - an Approach, Indian Space Research Association, Document 380 052, May 1992.


RE: Effective Tensile Area of Thread

(OP)
Thanks CoryPad.

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