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Surge Pressure frictional Absorbtion

Surge Pressure frictional Absorbtion

(OP)
Hello,

I'm not a big hydraulics expert and would appreciate any tips and advices to the below issue.

We in Oilfield have an equipment piece called a ball seat. When running a hydraulic activated equipment downhole (Oil Wells) a steel ball will be dropped downhole and pumped to the Ball Seat. So the pressure integrity is created. Pressure will be increase up to e.g. 2000 psi hydraulic components activated. Pressure will be increased one more time to 3000 psi the ball seat sheared, hydraulic communication re-established. However the surge wave pressure created by the differential pressure release across the ball seat is a huge concern, as it can fracture the formation.
My question is how to calculate the amount of the surge reaching the bottom of a cylindrical well and the amout of pressure loss during the wave travel, created when a compressed to 3000psi 20bbls of fluid are suddenly released to a 50 bbl 10 000 ft long x 4inch OD lower well section filled with an uncompressed fluid.

Thank you in advance,
Regards,
Farrukh

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