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wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

(OP)
check this process out http://carbon3d.com/

RE: wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

That CLIP method seems really nice, as I don't see any support material. I can't wait to see other non-spherical parts off their machine, and a price. It look like the tray of "goo" is only 3/8" deep or so, so I wonder what build envelope is.

"Art without engineering is dreaming; Engineering without art is calculating."

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RE: wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

Any supports would be created from the same material... most examples will print parts that don't require supports. Print that ball inside of a torus and you'll see a lot of support structure show up.

There has been discussion of this printer on another forum I'm on. When it was first brought up, and even now, I still can't wrap my head around this technology (or why it's necessary, if even true). What purpose does this supposed limit-oxygen area serve? Plenty of UV laser-based systems out there now, and they work on the same overall function... scan a layer of resin to harden it, raise object out of resin pool, repeat process until finished. This limited-oxygen thing just seems too much like voodoo marketing speak. I want to understand, but the website doesn't exactly give any useful info.

Dan - Owner
http://www.Hi-TecDesigns.com

RE: wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

This technology has been around a couple years, they are finally developing it. Very cool!

Chris, CSWA
SolidWorks 14
SolidWorks Legion

RE: wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

But what is this new "technology"? No one can seem to define what they are doing differently than any other UV laser-based printer.

Dan - Owner
http://www.Hi-TecDesigns.com

RE: wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

I didn't hear anything that actually described it in any useful way. How does oxygen affect the growth? How is this any different than any other system that grows the object from the top down via lasering through a window into a pool of resin? The oxygen thing almost sounds like a red herring.

Dan - Owner
http://www.Hi-TecDesigns.com

RE: wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

(OP)
ok, so you build from the bottom of the tank instead of the top. Having a "dead zone" against the glass makes the part not stick as it's cured by the light. I get the impression that it's nice to "play a movie" with their projector instead of twiddling a laser around the surface for each layer.

RE: wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

Yeah, theirs uses an LCD projector format... plenty of those types around, as well. Still not getting the oxygen part.

Dan - Owner
http://www.Hi-TecDesigns.com

RE: wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

Isn't this a re run on the old stereo lithography that has been around since the 1970s?
B.E.

You are judged not by what you know, but by what you can do.

RE: wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

Quote (Tron: Legacy)

Alan Bradley: Given the prices that we charge to students and schools, what sort of improvements have been made in Flynn… I mean ENCOM OS-12?
Richard Mackey: This year we put a “12” on the box.

My impression... I'm not seeing anything "new" - just a repackaging of existing technology but in a new box. There may be some technicality that is "new" but if anything, it's certain just a new flavor of old technology, barely distinguishable.

_________________________________________
NX8.0, Solidworks 2014, AutoCAD, Enovia V5

RE: wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

berkshire,
That was my thought also.

Chris, CSWA
SolidWorks 14
SolidWorks Legion

RE: wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

My desire for a complete understanding stems from a recent argument that was started in another forum I visit. Someone posted a link to a technology (along the same lines as here) that had lots of buzzwords in the title, but on further reflection, the buzzwords were meaningless in the context. In the end, it was decided there was nothing new at all, just a repackaging of many years old technology and a very overzealous marketing department (and CEO, since he personally visited the site and gave a thumbs up... though no further explanation, of course).

I tire of companies getting everyone riled up for nothing more than a set of spoons with a new color packaging... "Look! These spoons now come with a GREEN ribbon on the box. It's new technology that no one else has!" Pfft. neutral

Dan - Owner
http://www.Hi-TecDesigns.com

RE: wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

(OP)
So, what limits the speed of the top-down SL process?


RE: wow, that's cool - continuously "grown" plastic parts

Looks like a significant leap forward for 3D printing in terms of speed (x100 on SLA) and materials range. However I get the impression it is not quite ready for the general market.

http://hackedgadgets.com/2015/03/24/super-fast-3d-...

How much and when for a desktop system?

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