INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Jobs

stress, in the capsule diaphragm

stress, in the capsule diaphragm

(OP)
if you saw a convoluted capsule diaphragm, you may wonder how to calculate the stress. I do not know. help me?

RE: stress, in the capsule diaphragm

DHO

I am at a loss to understand Your question. I work with aerospace pneumatic and fluid system components and have never heard of a "convoluted capsule diaphragm"!?!?

Photos/sketch of the component MIGHT help us understand what it is.

Regards, Wil Taylor

Trust Me! I'm an engineer!

Trust - But Verify!

We believe to be true what we prefer to be true.

For those who believe, no proof is required; for those who cannot believe, no proof is possible.

Unfortunately, in science what You 'believe' is irrelevant รป "Orion"

RE: stress, in the capsule diaphragm

Is this a pressure switch?
Or a diaphragm pump?
Does the cavity that the diaphragm moves in have a function other than being the surface the diaphragm rests against?

I suspect you're looking for the load or pressure that causes it to invert. Can a test be done?

STF

RE: stress, in the capsule diaphragm

(OP)
yes. it is a pressure switch. the curved back on upper part is for the diaphragm to rest for proof, burst pressure purpose.
also, it "is" also a diaphragm pump, when the diaphragm is pushed down (as a ground check when installed on fire extinguisher).
i am looking for the cycle life when the diaphragm is pushed down (and let it up) when a constant pressure is applied.
thanks.

RE: stress, in the capsule diaphragm

An estimate can be found in Roark's Formulas for Stress and Strain. Look for the cases of circular plate loading, for an "annular" shape.
Anything more profound than that, and you may need to go down to the basics: Timoshenko et. al.
One thing that might help, since the disk is circular, is that you can assume the stress in any "dr" ring is uniform, so it's a one-dimensional integral.

STF

RE: stress, in the capsule diaphragm

You may try Finite Element Analysis; probably, any standard software would do.

RE: stress, in the capsule diaphragm

dho-

Based simply on what your sketch shows, I don't see how the applied upward pressure force and the axial travel of the piston will overstress the metal diaphragm. The piston and thin metal diaphragm will simply unload once they contact the upper housing surface. However, if pressure is applied to the thin metal diaphragm to drive the piston downward, then you need to look at the stresses in the weld joint between the thin diaphragm edge and the thicker piston edge. This is where it will likely fail when the piston stops against the lower housing surface.

RE: stress, in the capsule diaphragm

(OP)
SPM, i have no idea if FEA can handle such case, a .002" diaphragm. have you any experience?
(i have no access to FEA.)

RE: stress, in the capsule diaphragm

(OP)
you are right, the stress will be gone when the diaphragm rests against the upper housing. as a pressure sensor, the diaphragm will move up and down under applied variable pressure (against a loaded spring on the stop/piston which is not shown). as another requirement, customer wants to apply motion to the stop/piston against the system pressure to verify the operation of the pressure sensor. seems the calculation of the stress is not an easy job (to me), i ran a test, it passed my life cycle target. thanks. to all.
ps, the diaphragm is not welded to the stop/piston.

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!


Resources


Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close