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Bulk modulus of compressibility

Bulk modulus of compressibility

(OP)
Well that should be a basic question but for me it needs some clarification .
for the bulk modulus of compressibility : K = - dP / (dV/V)
why does K = 0 for compressible fluids ?? ,,,, I think of it like if we compress gas ie:decrease a certain masses volume (compressible fluid) its pressure will increase . So K would have a value greater than zero .
Can anyone help me figure out why it should be = 0 ??

RE: Bulk modulus of compressibility

For a gas PV is constant at constant temperature. If pressure goes up by ten percent, volume decreases by ten percent. Thus K is equal to one, not zero. However, for practical purposes, this value is orders of magnitude less than that for liquids and solids, so that it can be neglected, or taken to be zero.

RE: Bulk modulus of compressibility

consider that bulk modulus is the inverse of isothermal compressibility,

isothermal compressibility coefficient = -(1/V)*dV/dP

or the derivative of volume vs. pressure,
bulk modulus is not 0 for real gases, see below,
for the derivative of volume vs. temperature

volumetric expansivity coefficient = (1/V) dV/dT

for mixture you can calculate these properties for both vapors and liquids
with a EOS or equivalent procedures,
see for example the Excel macros StrGIC, StrLIC, StrGVE, StrLVE in

"http://www.prode.com/en/properties.htm"

another possibility is

"http://www.nist.gov/srd/nist23.cfm"

RE: Bulk modulus of compressibility

Use "compressibility factors" for gases.

you must get smarter than the software you're using.

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