INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Jobs

What's the best career path for Completions Tools field Engineer?

What's the best career path for Completions Tools field Engineer?

(OP)
I currently have 1.5 years as a field engineer. I am exposed to and collaborate with many areas of the oil service field; Drilling, frac, wireline, coil tubing (usually a bad sign), and cement. I don't have many years of experience and was wondering how many years you should have before moving on. I am very interested in becoming a drilling or completions engineer. Long hours and living at a well site don't bother me but neither does office work. I have a few questions about the career path I should take.

I really like the aspects of drilling and the challenges that arise. I preplan/install liner hangers so I am on a drilling rig for 2-4 days very often. Is it a good idea to do become a drilling engineer right now? If drilling slows down will I still have a job or be marketable in other areas? What is a next step after drilling engineer?

I work with a lot of frac sleeves, toe sleeves, and swell packer technology. Production/cost benefit planning sounds fun, that's where the interest in Completions Engineering comes in.  

I've also considered cross training in a few other disciplines and eventually become a company man or consultant. If anyone has any experience with oilfield career paths please let me know what you think.  

RE: What's the best career path for Completions Tools field Engineer?

Do you have an Engineering Degree? That would be compulsory with most companies for the position of Drilling Engineer.

Not meaning to be disrespectful, but your writing skills are horrendous. If you plan to work in the U.S., learn to write the English language properly or your upward career path will hit a ceiling quickly. Again, not trying to be respectful, just passing along something you will find out sooner or later.

RE: What's the best career path for Completions Tools field Engineer?

I think that the writing style would be more of an issue but again anyone who writes has his or her own style. Sure the OP may be fragmented in thoughts, however, the grammar is not bad considering how engineers write.

RE: What's the best career path for Completions Tools field Engineer?

Acceptance of mediocrity is the first step towards failure.

RE: What's the best career path for Completions Tools field Engineer?

(OP)
Not trying to be respectful or disrespectful? Look at your last sentence. I have an engineering degree and a math minor. Unfortunately I don't have the superior English degree that you do but I'm pretty successful nonetheless.

Advice from anyone actually in the industry would be greatly appreciated.

RE: What's the best career path for Completions Tools field Engineer?

Glad you caught my mistake; I like the way your thinking. Don't get bent out of shape by constructive criticism; shut your mouth and improve your self. If you think I'm a jerk, just wait until you hit the real world of office politics. I'm one of the nicest jerks you'll ever see.

RE: What's the best career path for Completions Tools field Engineer?

(OP)
What is your "profession" DubMac?

RE: What's the best career path for Completions Tools field Engineer?

I did nothing but roughneck and go to college until I was 30 yrs old; B.S. Petroleum Eng. TAMU.

I have been in either the drilling industry or rotating equipment all of my life. Have worked for Majors and have owned my own companies (currently). I was trained by stodgy old farts and used to laugh at their being so out of touch with the "new times". It took a lot of bruises along the way to realize they were right and I was wrong; that truthful things never change.

I apologize for being a bit harsh earlier; but truly one of the most powerful and rewarding attributes you can ever possess is an excellent communication skill. The English language is the most powerful weapon in your bag; use it to your advantage. Most of your fellow engineers won't. Engineering skills are a dime a dozen; being able to communicate them effectively to the customer is what will separate you from the pocket protector crowd and get you that position you're looking for.

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!


Resources


Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close