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Vehicle Drifting

Vehicle Drifting

(OP)
Hello,

I recently joined Engineering-tips and found this interesting forum.
I am trying to understand following suspension behavior and its effects on vehicle drift while it is moving:

Front left tilt/lean:
If there is a tilt/leaning on front left side(suspension) of a vehicle, which side the vehicle will drift while moving?

Rear Right tilt/lean:
If there is a tilt/leaning on rear right side(suspension) of a vehicle, which side the vehicle will drift while moving?

All the tire pressures are same.

I would appreciate any help in understanding this theory

Thanks,
aeromatters

RE: Vehicle Drifting

The wiki article on vehicle dynamics is not very good, but it does include links to the usual terminology. Lean is associated with motorbikes more than cars.

You may be talking about camber, in which case a tire generates a side force towards the side that the top has moved towards.

However, if a /car/ rolls to the left then the effect is compounded by roll steer and probably other things.

Cheers

Greg Locock


New here? Try reading these, they might help FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies http://eng-tips.com/market.cfm?

RE: Vehicle Drifting

(OP)
Hi Greg,

Thanks for your reply. Let me try to elaborate and explain what i was trying to ask:

If we park a car/suv on a flat surface with equal tire pressure and car/suv body seems to have a tilt(not straight) on one side, is it going to roll the car out of a lane once it is driven on a flat surface?

Assumption: Please consider top view of the vehicle for mentioned below scenarios. And car/suv is driven on flat surface.

Scenario 1==>Front Left Wheel:
If there is a tilt on front left side of the car/suv(distance between the chassis and flat surface on left is less as compared to the distance between chassis and flat surface on right), which side the car/suv will roll if driven on a flat surface.

Scenario 2==>Rear Right Wheel:
If there is a tilt on rear right side of the car/suv(distance between the chassis and flat surface on right is less as compared to the distance between chassis and flat surface on left), which side the car/suv will roll if driven on a flat surface.

I would appreciate your reply!

Thanks,
aeromatters

RE: Vehicle Drifting

"If we park a car/suv on a flat surface with equal tire pressure and car/suv body seems to have a tilt(not straight) on one side, is it going to roll the car out of a lane once it is driven on a flat surface?"

Yes, some cars are very sensitive to this (ie you can steer the car by moving across the back seat) others aren't.

Exactly which way the vehicle will drift depends on several factors, suspension design/kinematics being the one that springs to mind.

Cheers

Greg Locock


New here? Try reading these, they might help FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies http://eng-tips.com/market.cfm?

RE: Vehicle Drifting

(OP)
Thanks Greg. Its a SUV. Whether driver sits in the driving seat or not, there is a tilt in right rear side.
It is also irrespective of passenger sitting in the suv.

RE: Vehicle Drifting

"suspension design/kinematics being the one that springs to mind"

bigsmile

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