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coilovers with or without gas

coilovers with or without gas

coilovers with or without gas

(OP)
Hello.
I am trying to get some info about a set of Aragosta Coilovers because I am going to make an extension kit for them

I wonder if anyone know if they are safe to disassemble, or if they are gas charged?

The marking on them are 3A00. T1.A1.201

When I started to disassemble them, I could see a rubber seal in the end of the threads, so I stopped and assembled them again.

Thank You

RE: coilovers with or without gas

I've never heard of that brand name, but ALL modern GOOD suspension dampers that I am aware of, are gas-charged. Close inspection should reveal the charging valve, although it might not necessarily be a Schrader valve.

RE: coilovers with or without gas

Quote (their website)


The Aragosta system employs smooth non-preloaded multi-stage valving systems in both rebound and compression, is gas-pressurized for fade-free performance, and is adjustable in both rebound and compression without removing the damping units from the car.

RE: coilovers with or without gas

@TrollTor

No, the information I posted came from this site:
http://www.aragosta-suspension.com/operation.html

Which may or may not is related to the aftermarket kit you are talking about.
If you compress the damper (without the spring) and the damper shaft/rod extents afterwards on it's own until it reaches the max. extended position, the damper is gas charged/pressurized.
Chances are high, that this is the case.

if the shaft/piston rod stays inside/doesn't extent on it's own, you may have a non pressurized twin tube damper.
but today even twin-tubes are normally lightly pressurized (< 5bar), to improve performance.
Be careful, even so, that I think it is extremely unlikely to find such a damper in this kind of application (aftermarket kit), there is the possibility, that even if the rod/shaft doesn't extent, you have a pressurized damper with through rod/shaft technology.
But I doubt that this is the case.

In all likelihood you deal with an pressurized monotube damper with a charge pressure of 10-15 bar.
Be aware, that there is no need for any form of (gas) filling valve, to be found (as mentioned above).
Make the compression test, and if the shaft/rod extents afterwards - be careful when you try to open it, because it will be pressurized.

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