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input WATER HAMMER in static model

input WATER HAMMER in static model

(OP)
Hello,

Please, find attached an example of a piping system. Considering water hammer effect because the valve at node 60.
I want to analize in a static model the pressure effect in my piping system. I consider that the wave return to the pipe and I have to introduce a force in each change of direction. I introduce the force "F" till no more restraint in the same dirección (the force F at node 50 is compensated by the restraint Rx at node 35, the force F at node 40 is compensated by the restraint Ry at node 35 and the force F at node 30 is compensated by the restraint Rz at node 35).

Do you think that is it a correct way to analize the water hammer in a static analysis?


Thanks in advance.

RE: input WATER HAMMER in static model

As always, ΣFx = 0, ΣFy = 0
How the forces are distributed between supports depend on rigidity of the pipe between supports.

Independent events are seldomly independent.

RE: input WATER HAMMER in static model

(OP)
but, do you consider this method as correct to analyze the water hammer in the piping system?

RE: input WATER HAMMER in static model

I don't know any other way to apply forces. Once you know the forces, they're like any other load. Apply them to the structure where they occur and do the structural analysis. You haven't said anything about the analysis methods.

Do you mean how the momentum forces are calculated, or if pressure and pressure expansion stresses are included? You haven't said anything about that either.

Independent events are seldomly independent.

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