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Silje (Mechanical)
18 Sep 13 5:00
Hello,

do some of the Americans here knows about the lifetime cycles of a pressure vessel. We have different cycles with pressure and temperature changes, so we always do a FEM approval, that the chamber can stand at least 25000 cycles. In Europe nobody is interested in having this number whether on the name plate nor the drawings. How about the US market? I could not find it in ASME VIII, but it is big, so perhaps no wonder. Does an inspector normally ask for it? Is ASME demanding it on drawings or name plates?
Thank you, Silje
SnTMan (Mechanical)
18 Sep 13 11:04
Never seen any such.

Regards,

Mike
racookpe1978 (Nuclear)
18 Sep 13 11:49
I think its useful information - essential certainly in evaluating a PV for a new use or for retention when a plant goes for modernization or life cycle extension after 40 or 50 years. But at the same time, does the engineer after 50 years of serviced know how many times the PV has actually been cycled?

Or, differently, perhaps that will the specific key that DOES allow the PV to be continued in service! For example, a paint-mixing drum is cycled once per week for 32 years to change colors. Or a air recharge tank is cycled once per minute to refill a discharge drum, but is only vented once per year. Or a steam drum is shut down one a year. Averages and guesses, but at least there is something to go on.
TGS4 (Mechanical)
18 Sep 13 13:46
That is required information for an ASME Section VIII, Division 2 vessel.
Silje (Mechanical)
19 Sep 13 3:33
We have only a Div.1 vessel. We do the life cycle calculation according to EN13445, because ASME can't give us the calculations for this kind of vessel. That means to me, that we can mention it, but we don't have to, only if the customer asks for it.
Thank you

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