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Understanding the structure of CE directives / relevant national standards

Understanding the structure of CE directives / relevant national standards

(OP)
I have a basic question that I have not yet understood in spite of reading what I can about CE.

My company needs to provide some equipment with ATEX and CE markings. While we understand much of what's involved I want to follow the structure of the requirements starting with the high level directives.

Once I read the main directives, how does one determine which national / EN standards we must also comply with? Am I reliant on consultants / the notifying bodies to provide this list?

Thanks, David

RE: Understanding the structure of CE directives / relevant national standards

David, is it for pressure equipment? Im not familiar with (directives for) ATEX, but for pressure equipment, PED 97/23/EC usually applies.
The PED gives you all freedom to choose your design code of choice. However there are some restictions, for example the essential safety requirements.
The PED itself is kinda heard to read and understand at once/1st time reading, however the PED Guidelines may be of great help.

In general I believe a NoBo may also help you (better).
Could you shed some more light on the application you're dealing with?

RE: Understanding the structure of CE directives / relevant national standards

(OP)
The equipment is an agitator with mechanical seal. I suppose that means the mounting flange and seal are pressure containing items.

A NoBo certainly will be in the picture at some point very soon. I figure that with a good fundamental understanding of the system and imposed requirements, we can propose elegant and effective interpretations and solutions to meet the directive. I have learned to avoid like plague to be reliant on an outside party (*cough* consultant *cough*) to make up the rules as we go along.

David

RE: Understanding the structure of CE directives / relevant national standards

When the agitator with mechanical seal falls under the PED, nay applied code, if properly documented in the Manufacturing Data Book, usually complies to the PED requirements.
Agitator flanges with mechanical seals; not sure where they fall under the PED. They may be drawn up with the vessel as one assembly, however, as agitators may also be supplied as 'stock items', they could be categorized as pressure accessories. I think the NoBo may provide you with a better answer than mine.

RE: Understanding the structure of CE directives / relevant national standards

(OP)
Following directives is a smaller problem than the question of which national standards are required to comply with a directive. There are innumerable national standards and only a handful of directives, and the directives can be read in total for free. Even if I wanted to browse national standards my company is not going to spend the big bucks for an unlimited subscription to the standard list.

RE: Understanding the structure of CE directives / relevant national standards

(OP)
Answering my own question, there is a link to a list of individual standards on each directive page.

For example, the Machinery Directive page
http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/policies/european-s...
has a link titled "Commission Communication in the Framework ...", which is actually the link to the list of Harmonised Standards that support the directive in question. The same document is available in multiple languages right below the main link.

The title of the link and format is difference from the actual Directive and Guideline documents, making the link to the standards list much less obvious. But it's there.

Furthermore, the question about the structure of the Directive is fairly straightforward, even if it's poorly shown on the website.
Directive is at the top. Supporting the Directive is the Guideline document and the latest Harmonised Standard list. All of these are free for download. Then from the relevant Standards list, you must buy the EN standards that apply to your equipment.

David

RE: Understanding the structure of CE directives / relevant national standards

You're correct David, totally forgot about this list of harmonised (and acknowledged) standards.
These standards usually have an Annex ZA outlining conformity with the applicable Directive.

Dont forget other standards may also be used (e.g. see paragraph 87 of the guidelines for the machinery directive), however conformity with any Directive than is not guaranteed.

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