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Requiring Assistance in Forging Stainless Steel

2think (Mechanical) (OP)
3 Apr 12 19:45
Hello,

First off, thank you to anyone who wishes to help me in this endeavor.  Second, I am new to Eng-Tips and if my question(s) seem or are not appropriate for this forum/site, by all means, please, let me know.

I am in need of some assistance in pointing me in the right direction regarding the forging of the attached small Axe head part (should be no more than 1.00 - 1.20 lbs).  My question is two fold:

First - I would like to forge this part using either 420SS or Carpenter Custom 465SS in the H1000 condition.  Can a drop/hammer forge process accomplish this or would it be better to find a hydraulic forge press to do the job?  All voids shown would be secondary ops I'm sure.

Second - I only need small quantities (25-50 units) as this is a prototype.  For the past year I have had NO success in finding a forging company who can help me with this; I've tried literally 100+ companies.  Can anyone help me in sourcing a forging company which has the technical expertise, proper equipment and does not mind dealing with one-man operations and could accomplish the manufacture of this part in the given metals and treatment?

Thank you!
 
TVP (Materials)
4 Apr 12 13:16
Claw hammers can be forged either by hammers (drop forging) or by mechanical presses.  The following link shows a good example of the process for forging a claw hammer using a mechanical press:

http://www.simufact-americas.com/references/2001.1_Forging_Process_Design_For_Vaughans_999_20_Oz_Claw_Hammer_Using_MSC.SuperForge.pdf


My experience is only with larger forging operations like Modern Forge and Trenton Forging that service the auto industry.  They can forge the parts, its just whether or not they want to be do for only 25-50 pieces.  Have you looked through the FIA list of member companies?  Perhaps some of the smaller companies would be interested:

http://www.forging.org/member-companies

 
2think (Mechanical) (OP)
4 Apr 12 16:17
Thanks TVP for your info and insight into my project!

The problem, from what I understand, is that Stainless, regardless of alloy, is very difficult to HAMMER forge .vs. using a Press.  Chromoly Steel Alloys (4100 series) seem to be better for a HAMMER but I'd still rather use the Stainless alloys I've described in my first post, based upon the application (wet and cold environments).  I suppose I could still use the 4100 series of steel but need to find a really tough coating to prevent rusting as well.  I wanted to get different opinions on all this before I went further down the path of Stainless Steels to confirm what I've been told.

Regarding using Modern Forge and Trenton, yes, I have contacted them as well, and you hit on it, they didn't want to consider small quantities, unfortunately.

I have contacted several of the companies listed in the FIA, but not all of them.  I think I will now try and concentrate on the smaller companies listed, like you said, and see what they say.  Again, Thanks!
 
TVP (Materials)
5 Apr 12 9:34
2think (Mechanical) (OP)
6 Apr 12 16:44
Thanks again TVP for the heads up and recommendations.  I'll give them a shot.

Have a great weekend and Easter!
 

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