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asimpson (Mechanical) (OP)
6 Mar 12 4:57
I need to do machining work on a large display stand made of 25mm clear acrylic (PMMA) sheet.  I am finding it difficult to get information on cutting with hand circular saws, routers and reciprocating saws.  Specifically tooth forms, cutting speed and use of coolant or any other useful advice.

Any pointers welcome.

Many thamks.

 
Eltron (Mechanical)
6 Mar 12 8:39
If you're just cutting the sheet then I generally don't use coolant.  If you are machining I find that mineral oil works well.  I would try to steer clear of reciprocating saws as they tend to melt the plastic back together behind the blade.  On a bandsaw try to have at least three teeth in the material at all times.  In general you use the same rules of thumb as you would for cutting wood.  For something that thick you will likely need a secondary operation to plane down the edges.

Dan

www.eltronresearch.com
Dan's Blog

btrueblood (Mechanical)
6 Mar 12 9:47
Find somebody with a big CO2 laser - it cuts acrylic like a dream.
tomwalz (Materials)
6 Mar 12 10:47
There are acrylic cutting saw blades.  

Decide if you want a smooth surface or a slightly rough surface for gluing.

I have the equipment to do it and have done it but I still take my work to a pro shop.   

Thomas J. Walz
Carbide Processors, Inc.
www.carbideprocessors.com

Good engineering starts with a Grainger Catalog.    

MikeHalloran (Mechanical)
6 Mar 12 13:03
New sharp tools that have _never_ been used on metal will cut acrylic pretty well.  

For coolant, if needed, I hate the smell, but nothing works better than kerosene.

 

Mike Halloran
Pembroke Pines, FL, USA

asimpson (Mechanical) (OP)
7 Mar 12 8:58
thanks everone

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