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jsin182 (Mechanical) (OP)
25 Jan 12 14:39
Would someone be so kind as to provide floor loading basics. It appears floors are typically rated in psf, is this the concentrated load on a 1 ft sq, the loading over the entire area between supports, or some of both. Fork truck 7000 lbs, floor rate at 200 psf, 10' x 10' spacing between supports.
A floor rated at 200 psf with 10' x 10' between supports; does this mean it will only bear a 200 pound load in a 1 sq ft area or 20,000 lbs within the 100 sq foot, if within the 100 sq ft how do you determine how much area is needed to spread any concentrated load?

Thank yo in advance
msquared48 (Structural)
25 Jan 12 15:31
When you are speaking of a pound per square foot loading, it is an area load, applied to the area you are designing, regardless of the horizontal framing scheme used.  

Different rooms/surfaces have different useages and loadings in the IBC - International Building Code.  You need to check there for your useage.

Autos usually are at 40 to 50 psf, with a corresponding point load situation that needs to be checked.  It's all explained in the IBC.

Mike McCann
MMC Engineering
http://mmcengineering.tripod.com
 

MiketheEngineer (Structural)
25 Jan 12 16:22
M^2 nailed it.
Once20036 (Structural)
25 Jan 12 16:41
Jsin,
I do not think that there is an easy answer to your question and it needs to be reviewed on a case by case basis.

Saying that a floor is designed for 200 psf means that it can safely support a 200lb load applied on any or every square foot of the slab.

Say you're dealing with a 200 psf rated floor on a 10'x10' bay.

Could you put 400 lb on a 1ftx1ft area in the center of the bay, with nothing else on the slab around it?
Probably.

Could you put 1000 lb on a 1ftx1ft area adjacent to a column, with nothing else on the slab around it?
Maybe

Could you put a 20,000lb (200psfx10'x10') load anywhere you want?
Not on my watch.

Anything more specific depends heavily on the construction materials/geometry/reinforcing/etc. Best to contact your friendly neighborhood structural engineer.
 

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