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Cracked hardwood in the marine environment

Cracked hardwood in the marine environment

(OP)
We have some non structural marine hardwood going in on a project and a piece of it is cracked. Aesthetically we may be able to live with it as it stands but the concern is it developing over time.

Does anyone:
a) have experience of cracked hardwood in a marine environment - will these cracks expand significantly over time?
b) know of any guidance available on quantifying how much worse we can expect this crack to get?
c) have experience of remedial measures? The two I can think of are coach screws or infill with a resin but I am not clear on how effective either of these options are.

RE: Cracked hardwood in the marine environment

How big, how deep?  Is it purely decorative, i.e., hanging on a wall, or is it subject to wear/stress?

TTFN
FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies

RE: Cracked hardwood in the marine environment

What is the function and species of this piece.
Can the crack be glued?
 I have Mahogony gunwhales on boats with cracks that have been there 50 years.
 Send more information.
B.E.

The good engineer does not need to memorize every formula; he just needs to know where he can find them when he needs them.  Old professor

RE: Cracked hardwood in the marine environment

(OP)
It's a timber rubbing strip along structural steelwork appx 100mm deep, 300mm tall and 2000m long.

The timber is ekki so good quality. The crack is at one if the corners & if it got worse you could expect a section 150mm square and appx half the depth (150mm) falling away.

 

RE: Cracked hardwood in the marine environment

2000m long??

As defined, a "rubbing strip" will encounter random and harsh loads, so it seems to me that such a device will break off under use.

TTFN
FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies

RE: Cracked hardwood in the marine environment

(OP)
It's in sections bolted and supported continuosly along its length.

 

RE: Cracked hardwood in the marine environment

Just change it when it breaks.
B.E.

The good engineer does not need to memorize every formula; he just needs to know where he can find them when he needs them.  Old professor

RE: Cracked hardwood in the marine environment

A friend of mine who owns a boat used an epoxy compound to repair dry rot on his wood deck.  Go to a marina and ask for help as there is material for boat repairs involving wood.

RE: Cracked hardwood in the marine environment

Matle
If you really need to fix it, Take some wedges and pry the joint apart a little. inject some one part moisture cured urethane glue ( Gorilla glue or Baltek ) into the joint and clamp it.
 The glue will expand filling any gaps, and will give you good service. The wood will most likely break before the glue fails.
 It will be best to do this on the dock before you put this timber into service
B.E.

The good engineer does not need to memorize every formula; he just needs to know where he can find them when he needs them.  Old professor

RE: Cracked hardwood in the marine environment

(OP)
berkshire - thank you for the response with the urethane glue, it was exactly the sort of guidance I was looking for.

Unfortunately inspecting the piece on site I concluded the wood was in worse condition than originally indicated and had to reject it on quality grounds. It is a bit of a pain but the supplier has assured us they will get a replacement on site in time that it won't affect the programme.

RE: Cracked hardwood in the marine environment

matle
I looked up the species you were using. It is called African oak or Ironwood in the USA where I am residing.
 It does have a tendency to develop shakes when drying, so I would recommend that you look closely at all of your timbers before you put them into service.
B.E.

The good engineer does not need to memorize every formula; he just needs to know where he can find them when he needs them.  Old professor

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