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Replacing Damaged Wood Joist in Old Brick Building

Replacing Damaged Wood Joist in Old Brick Building

(OP)
I have a three story brick building that requires the replacement of several wood joists that have been damaged over time.  The building was built in 1904 and the walls step in one brick at each floor level until you get to the third floor where the joist no longer sit on a ledge but are in joist pockets which makes replacement difficult without removal of a large portion of the brick above the joist to allow for the new joist to be installed.  Does anyone know of an adjustable metal barjoist / beam that could be used to replace these without all of the brick work?  Or would it be feasable to lap two new joists, lvls, etc...and bolt them together.  The existing building is ~ 25'6" inside of wall to inside of wall with ~ 4" joist pockets in the brick.  The joists are ~ 2-1/2" x 14" rough pine on 16" centers.  The floor will be 2"x4" stripping, perpindicular to the joist on 16" centers, shimmed as required to help level the flooring and will have 3/4" t& g decking and wood flooring above.  The ceiling below will be similar with 1" x 4" stirpping, perpendicular, 16" oc and R-30 fibedrgalss insulation and 5/8" gyp board.  Thanks for your time.

RE: Replacing Damaged Wood Joist in Old Brick Building

Depending on mechanical and electrical, sistering on another joist or two and bolting/nailing/glueing is usually the best option.  Microlams would be a good choice considering the much better grade of lumber at the turn of the last century.

Mike McCann
MMC Engineering
http://mmcengineering.tripod.com
 

RE: Replacing Damaged Wood Joist in Old Brick Building

You'll want to check the ends of the beams on the brick - chances are pretty good that they're rotten since they've been in contact with brick for so long.

Sistering is a good option if the ends are still ok.  If not, they need to be replaced.  You only need to remove a few bricks to get at each end to replace the beam into the pocket, and the new ones can be protected and the cavities packed tight.

If you're not a structural with lots of historic experience, I recommend hiring someone who is.

RE: Replacing Damaged Wood Joist in Old Brick Building

Agree with both gentlemen!!

RE: Replacing Damaged Wood Joist in Old Brick Building

(OP)
Thanks for the replies.  Suprisingly, the joist pockets seem to be in good shape, it is the middles that are suffering.  Thanks again.

RE: Replacing Damaged Wood Joist in Old Brick Building

LOL Mike - I'm a woman!

RE: Replacing Damaged Wood Joist in Old Brick Building

That's the second time in the last week Mike.  Try to get it correct, will ya?  bigsmile

Mike McCann
MMC Engineering
http://mmcengineering.tripod.com
 

RE: Replacing Damaged Wood Joist in Old Brick Building

Guess I don't read too well!!!  Didn't realize that slta was a woman.  MY APOLOGIES.  I dated a very good looking woman SE in college.  She was great - things just didn't work out.   Go figure.  Wonder where she is??  Name of Carol B - graduated Mizzou in about 1977 or 78

RE: Replacing Damaged Wood Joist in Old Brick Building

Mike, it's all good - just made me laugh!

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