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Question about C=0 Zero Acceptance Number Sampling Plan

vphan27 (Mechanical)
14 Nov 11 18:41
My company is using the following sampling table based on Nicholas Sequigla's Zero Acceptance Number Sampling Plan:

http://guidebook.dcma.mil/226/tools_links_file/stat-sample.htm

My question is where do the sampling size numbers in the table come from?  What statistics equation/formula is used to arrive at these sampling size numbers?  How is this statistics formula used to get these numbers?  

I have read that the numbers may come from Hypergeometric distribution, Poisson distribution, or Binomial distribution.  I have tried applying these formulas but still do not understand how they got the numbers in the table.

For example, the table states that for a lot size of 51 to 90 and AQL of 1%, the sample size is 13.  My question is how was it determined that 13 is the sufficient sample size?  There must be a statistics formula used to calculate this 13.

If someone can proivde me with a thorough explanation, I would truly appreciate it.
GregLocock (Automotive)
14 Nov 11 21:46
I'd have thought that if you want a mathematical explanation a maths book would be a great place to start. Perhaps even reading Squeglia's book?

However, it is often useful to create lots of random populations and see if you can get a feel for where the numbers come from.  

Cheers

Greg Locock


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